In This Section

Digital Culture and Design

The Bachelor of Arts in Digital Culture and Design is a cross-disciplinary and multi-modal approach to the production, distribution, management, and critical analysis of digital culture as well as the application of digital solutions to research projects in the humanities disciplines. Benefiting from an array of pedagogies that take advantage of contemporary instructional technologies, students will acquire the knowledge base and skills necessary to create, market, organize, evaluate, and disseminate digital content informed by the humanities.

The Student Experience: Critical Making

In creating the content for their projects, students will hone their skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and cultural awareness. More importantly, students will explore a critical, reflexive approach to the design, creation, and utilization of digital technologies in the humanities by examining the impacts of such technologies on humanistic expression. 

  • Combines liberal arts-based critical thinking skills with experiential learning and the development of intensive training in computer coding, digital curation, and web-based design, analytics, animation, and innovations across the spectrum of emerging new media platforms and discourse.
  • Linked to a new humanities computing facility, the Edwards Digital Commons, which features advanced 3D and animation computing, interactive conferencing; and a state-of-the-art interactive digital classroom.
  • Provides a hyrbid model of delivery, allowing students to take classes online and in person.
Beyond the Classroom

The Digital Culture and Design program emphasizes a 21st-century liberal arts curriculum. You will leave the program with experience in manipulating objects, codes, and built environments, and with a reflexivity about the ethical, aesthetic and political implications of making as a form of interpreting and analyzing. A pedagogy of making is not just about problem solving but making active choices about what built environments we cultivate and evolve.

  • Digital and multimedia journalism
  • Online editing, writing and publishing
  • Museum curation
  • Interactive exhibit design
  • Social media research and marketing
  • Web design and writing
  • Digital art and design
  • Gaming and animation
  • Library resource management
  • Archival management
  • Virtual public history
Courses

DOWNLOAD A SAMPLE DEGREE PROGRAM HERE (Digital writing/texts/editing track): Sample Program: Writing/editing/text track 

101 Humanities in the Digital Age. (3) The first half of this course provides a critical overview of methods, tools, and projects in the Digital Humanities; the second half of the course is devoted to a very basic introduction to building and using such tools in digital humanities projects. Students will leave the course with both a practical introduction to computational methods and a critical lens for understanding the impact of new media and digital tools on humanities inquiry and the liberal arts. F, S, Su. 

200 Introduction to Digital Humanities. (3) An introductory course that provides students with a broad overview of the history, concepts, and methods of computing in the humanities. This course focuses not only on how use of computer technology has evolved in humanities disciplines and humanitiescentered interdisciplinary research, but also explores basic methods and techniques in digital humanities through the examination of existing projects and hands-on exercises that allow students to build practical skill sets. F, S, Su.

 

201 Coding for Humanists. (3) This course provides a basic knowledge of how computers operate and are operated, as well as the computational and procedural logics, media, and languages employed in the Digital Humanities. Students will also achieve a basic understanding of the principles of coding. The course also serves as an introduction to modes of collaboration between those who work conceptually with the Digital Humanities and those who are assigned the tasks of implementing the technical side of such projects. F, S, Su.

 

202 Introduction to Digital Sources. (3) An introductory course that provides students with an overview of digital sources in the humanities. This course focuses not only on how the creation and use of digital sources have evolved in humanities disciplines and humanities-centered interdisciplinary research, but also explores the use of these sources through a critical examination of existing projects that utilize digital images, texts, maps, audio, and other digital media. Students will also develop practical skill sets through hands-on exercises utilizing humanities-based digital resources. F, S, Su.

 

302 Visual Methods. (3) (Prereq: DCD 345) An intermediate course that provides students with an in-depth exploration of the theories and practicum of visual and verbal elements used by visual communicators. This course will build on the issues found in relation to cultural shifts in aesthetic trends and consumer behavior while also discussing solutions created by visual communicators and the software tools used. F, S, Su. 

 

309 Interactivity and Culture. (3) The first half of this course provides a critical overview of concepts of interactivity and immersion, historically and within new media and digital culture; the second half of the course is devoted to a very basic introduction to building and using interactive structures, drawing on and developing skills and methods taught in earlier courses in the sequence. Students will leave the course with both a practical introduction to computational methods across humanities disciplines, and a critical lens for understanding the impact of new media and digital tools on humanities inquiry and the liberal arts. F, S, Su.

 

 312 Social Media. (3) This course provides a critical overview of concepts and best practices surrounding social media, historically and within new media and digital culture. Topics addressed will include new research on attention and cognition within digital culture, perceptions and skills necessary for critical consumption of information, best practices of digital participation and collective participatory culture, and the use of collaborative media and methodologies within networked environments. Students will get practice employing social media tools for projects on social media critique, analysis, and development. F, S, Su.

 

345 Knowledge Production and Digital Representation. (3) (Prereq: DCD 100, DCD 101, DCD 102, DCD 200, DCD 201, and DCD 202) Theories of knowledge representation can facilitate our ability to express how we are modeling information in digital and mediated environments. This course is meant to give students foundation knowledge in advanced digital methods and theory. Topics addressed will include: integrated media theory; digital media and meaning making; disciplinary digital knowledge; and symbolic cognition and human meaning making. F, S, Su.

 

488 Q Capstone Course. (3) (Prereq: DCD 495 or DCD 496) This course serves as a culminating experience for the program of study in this degree, allowing the student to bring together all the skills and knowledge acquired in the courses to produce and publish online a project of his/her own design. May be repeated one time for credit. F, S.

 

496 Q Practicum. (3) (Prereq: DCD 345) The practicum requires 60 hours of on-site work, a journal, a final paper, and artifacts to be included in the student’s eportfolio. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills within a closely supervised work environment. By working on digital projects within the campus community, students also enhance their skills of collaboration and their understanding of project development and work flow. May be repeated one time for credit. F, S.

The DCD program offers a curriculum focused on intensive experiential learning alongside critical thinking and a newly developed pedagogical approach called “critical making.”  Critical making emphasizes a reflexive and experimental approach to the objects, artifacts and texts that make up our virtual and material environments.  At a moment when digital technologies and smart machines are populating all aspects of our lives, this pedagogical shift allows students to evolve their applied critical skills in tandem with existing approaches to linguistic and conceptual knowledge.

Contact

Jen Boyle, Ph.D., Coordinator of Digital Culture and Design and New Media and Digital Culture Minor (jboyle@coastal.edu)