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Art History Minor

Whether you are minoring in Art History or taking courses to support your art or design major, knowledge of the history of art is critical to any developing thinker/scholar/visionary. We offer coursework that explores art from its very beginnings to today, from cave paintings to the Italian Renaissance to American graphic novels to the birth of photography, while giving you both context and inspiration for your own artistic and scholarly endeavors.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

ARTH 105* History of Western Art I (3)
ARTH 106* History of Western Art II (3)
Choose one of the following: (3 Credits)
ARTH 341 Modern Art 1840-1940 (3)
ARTH 342 Post-Modern & Contemporary Art - 1940 to the Present (3)
ARTH 350 Art and Ideas (3)
Select 12 credits from any 300 or 400 level ARTH courses
* ARTH 105 and 106 satisfies the foundation requirement for Studio Art Major and may also be used to fulfill the Art History Minor requirement for Studio Art Majors. These courses cannot be the same ones used to satisfy the core curriculum requirement.
Total credits required for Art History Minor: 21
A grade of C or above is required in each course to be applied toward the minor.

COURSES

ARTH 105 History of Western Art I (3) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Paleolithic period through the Gothic period.

ARTH 106 History of Western Art II(3) A survey of the visual arts and their relevance to their times from the Renaissance to the present.

ARTH 308 History of Photography (3) A survey of the history of photography from 1839 to present. This course explores the history of photography from pre-photographic visual technologies to the current revolution of digital visual media. In addition to fine art photography, we will consider a variety of photographic genres, for example, documentary and landscape photography, portraiture, and family snapshots.

ARTH 322 Medieval Art & Architecture (3) (Cross-listed as HIST 322) A survey of the cultural and artistic trends from c. 300 to 1300, this course will focus on France, England, Germany, and Italy, while also examining important post-classical innovations in what are now Norway, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Egypt, and Syria. Much of the discussion will concern religious architecture, culminating in High Gothic cathedrals. Decorative arts such as illuminated manuscripts, mosaics, stained glass, and sculpture in wood, stone, bronze, and gold will also be central to the course content.

ARTH 323 Italian Renaissance Art & Architecture (3) (Cross-listed as HIST 323)This course surveys the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Italian peninsula c. 1300-1550 and the revival of classical ideals and philosophies of visual representation focusing primarily on Florence, Venice, and Rome. This course examines the art and ideas of inspired, creative minds such as Giotto, Masaccio, Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangeo, Raphael, Titian, Palladio, and many more.

ARTH 324 Baroque Art & Architecture (3) (Cross-listed as HIST 324) The 17th Century was a period of remarkable exploration, experimentation, and change. Those events were embodied in the painting, sculpture, and architecture of this Golden Age. Focusing on the Netherlands and Flanders (modern Holland and Belgium), Rome, France, and Spain, this course surveys the visionary ideas of Caravaggio, Caracci, Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Velasquez, Borromini, and Bernini among others.

ARTH 325 Art and the City. (3) Explores a single city and its architectural and artistic developments from its origins to the present. The course considers cultural and artistic influences and advancements from the perspective of location and geography rather than exclusively chronological conditions. The city to be explored will vary from semester to >semester. Course is repeatable only when the focus is on a different city.

ARTH 326 Northern Renaissance Art. (3) (Prereq: ARTH 105, 106, or permission of the instructor) May be used as an elective or cognate. This course is an art historical survey of Northern European Renaissance art from c. 1350 - c. 1550, including art from the Low Countries, France, Germany, and Spain. Content introduces students to the works of major cultural trends and artists, primarily in painting and sculpture. S.

ARTH 330 Rococo to Romanticism. (3) (Prereq: Sophomore standing or 30+ credits) May be used as an elective or cognate. This course explores European art from 1700 to the 1840s. Major artistic trends and artists from the Rococo, Enlightenment, Neoclassical, and Romantic periods will be covered. S.

ARTH 337 The Contemporary Graphic Novel. (3) This course examines the historical, cultural, artistic, literary and theoretical underpinnings of book-length graphic novels. After examining the history of the sequential narrative in various media, the course will focus on the mechanics of visual/textual storytelling and analyze a wide range of approaches to the discipline.

ARTH 340 American Art (3) A survey of the fine arts, popular arts, architecture, and material culture of the United States, taking into consideration important events in social, political, and economic history from the time of British colonies to the mid twentieth century.

ARTH 341 Modern Art 1800-1940 (3) This course follows the development of a modern consciousness within the art of Europe and the United States from 1800 to 1940. The progressive advance of stylistic movements during a time of revolutions, industrial, change, and colonial expansion includes neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, expressionism, cubism, surrealism, and others. The impact of non-European traditions on the growth of a modern aesthetic will be explored.

ARTH 342 Post-Modern & Contemporary Art - 1940 to the Present (3) Study of the major trends in art and visual practices within the United States and Europe, since 1940 to the present, in order to understand how artists engage a personal vision, political point of view, or intellectual goal in their interaction with the world.

ART 345 African American Art (3) An overview of the African-American presence in the finearts, popular arts, architecture and material culture produced in the United States from the time of the transatlantic slave trade to the present. Study includes both the art created by African descendent Americans as well as the representation of African-Americans by Euro-Americans.

ART 350 Art and Ideas (3) (Prereq: ARTH 101 or 105 or 106, or permission of in-structor) An introduction to aesthetics, art theory, and art criticism. Students will read and discuss a variety of philosophical and critical writings that relate to the visual arts.

ARTH 355 American Film (3) (Prereq: completion of an ARTH 100-level course with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor) This course is an introduction to a preeminent visual art form of the 20th century - the motion picture. This course will give students a criteria for interpreting filmwithin an historical context while introducing major genres, significant directors and influential screen actors from the formative years of this art.

ARTH 360 Gender and Ethnicity in Art (3) (Cross-listed as WGST 360) (Prereq: completion of an ARTH 100-level course with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor) (Writing Intensive) A critical examination of how gender and ethnicity have been represented in visual culture within the Western tradition.

ARTH 392 Critiquing the Museum (3) This course involves travel to museums and galleries in order to broaden our understanding about how viewers perceive and interact with art in various settings. We will consider how our responses are infl-enced by the manner of display, and the environment within which an exhibition is mounted. Travel destinations have included New York, Greece, Spain, Northern Europe, Oxford, and Paris, and may vary each time the course is offered.

ARTH 450 Ashes2Art: Digital Reconstructions of Ancient Monuments. (3) (Cross-listed as ARTD 450) Ashes2Art combines cutting edge digital technologies, art history, graphic and web design, and digital photography to recreate monuments of the ancient past. The course is completely hands-on and provides an extraordinary opportunity for students to combine various skills from disparate disciplines. Students will conduct focused research on a specificmonument (or city or object), write essays that summarize various opinions, and document those sources with an extended bibliography. Students then incorporate that research into a web-based project utilizing cutting edge technologies, including Adobe Photoshop, Google Earth, Sketch Up, Panoweaver, Tourweaver, Studio Max, Dreamweaver, Cinema 4D and Macromedia Flash animation. VISIT WEBSITE

ARTH 499 Special Topics in Visual Culture (3) (Prereq: ARTH 105, 106, or per-mission of instructor) Topics in visual culture of special interests but which are too specifc to be served by an established course. Topics may include but are not limited to more diverse imagery than traditionally offered in an art history survey course. May be taken more than once as the topic changes. Course fulfills upper level course requirement for ARTS majors.