Link to CCU Home Page
Link to Quick Links
Link to Search Link to CCU Home Page
News Releases
spacer image
 
July 31, 2014   
Posted: August 27, 2004
Coastal Carolina welcomes 29 new faculty members

  Some of CCU's new faculty for 2004-2005.  
Twenty-nine new faculty members have joined Coastal Carolina University for the 2004-2005 academic year. A listing of new faculty members by academic college follows:

E. Craig Wall Sr. College of Business Administration Thomas J. Anderson joins the faculty as a visiting assistant professor of management. He will be teaching organizational theory and strategic management. Anderson earned an M.B.A. in management and marketing from Florida State University. He was executive-in-residence at the Citadel, where he held the Francis Hipp Endowed Chair. Prior to joining the Citadel faculty, he was a general business manager and entrepreneur. Anderson is one of the original developers of word processing application software.

Marvin A. Keene, assistant professor of finance, will teach corporate finance and financial statement analysis. He earned a bachelor's degree in economics and recently completed his doctorate in finance, both from Florida State University. Keene's research focuses on time-series asset-pricing models and investments.

Karen A. Maguire, assistant professor of accounting, will teach financial and managerial accounting. She earned a Ph.D. in accounting from the University of Alabama, a master's degree from Boston College and a bachelor's degree from the American University in Washington, D.C. She has more than 10 years of experience in industry with such firms as American Health Care, Inc., Decision Analysts, Inc., and Digital Equipment Corporation. Maguire's research focuses in the area of empirical fraud research.

Barbara A. Ritter, an assistant professor of management and statistics, will teach human resource management and business statistics. She recently earned a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology at the University of Akron. She earned a bachelor's degree from Grand Valley State University and a master's degree from the University of Akron. Ritter's research interests include organizational justice and leadership, leader and follower interaction, and the public perception of organizational leaders.

Spadoni College of Education Gayle H. Disney is an assistant professor of education. She earned an Ed.D. in educational leadership and a master's degree in special education from Appalachian State University, and a bachelor's degree in English from East Carolina University. She has worked as transition coordinator for exceptional children and as a high school assistant principal. Her research interests include the use of teacher lore in teacher education, post secondary success of students with learning disabilities, and best practices in transition.

Judy B. Engelhard is an associate professor of education. She earned an Ed.D. from Virginia Tech, and she earned her master's and bachelor's degrees from Radford University. She comes to Coastal from George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., where she was associate professor and special education outreach coordinator in the graduate school of education. She is also professor emeritus at Radford University where she focused on teacher preparation in specific learning disabilities. Her professional interests include reading instruction and remediation, teacher quality and public policy.

Diane Gaskins joins the faculty as a visiting assistant professor of education. She recently completed the course work for her Ph.D. in special education research and teaching from the University of South Carolina. She earned a master's degree in special education-learning disabilities from the Citadel and a bachelor's degree in early childhood education and preschool special education from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. She worked in learning specialist positions, supporting teachers as they included students with learning disabilities into general education programs ranging from preschool to middle school.

Monair J. Hamilton is an assistant professor of health promotion. She is a doctoral candidate in health education and promotion from Kent State University, where she taught a variety of health courses as a teaching fellow. Hamilton earned a bachelor's degree in community health education from York College of the City University of New York (CUNY), and a master's degree in public health from Hunter College-CUNY. Her primary interests include minority health/health disparities and cardiovascular health of African-American adolescents.

Patricia S. Hardee is an assistant professor of education. She has worked at Coastal for the past three years as an instructor and associate director of clinical placements. She earned an Ed.D. from the University of South Carolina. Her experience includes 13 years in secondary and middle school education in South Carolina and Georgia public schools and six years in administration in the private sector. Her primary interests include curriculum and instruction, the impact of adoption on student performance, and teacher preparation.

Austin Hitt is an assistant professor in the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of West Florida, a master's degree in zoology from Auburn University, and a doctorate in science education from Indiana University. His area of interest is the development of model-based lessons for students that accurately reflect the way scientists conduct research, and determining how this work can be used in pre-service classes to enhance teacher preparation.

Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Miglena Ivanova is an assistant professor of English. She earned a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, where she majored in modern British and Irish literature, specializing in drama. Ivanova also completed a double minor in Swedish literature and Russian literature. Her research and teaching interests include translation and performance theory, European nationalism and its influence on literature and the arts and the history of drama and aesthetic reception.

Christopher Gerteis, an assistant professor of history, will lead upper-division courses on the histories of China and Japan as well as an introductory survey of world civilizations. Gerteis' area of expertise is the history of modern Japan and China. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 2001 and held a Social Science Research Council/Japan Society for the Promotion of Science postdoctoral research fellowship at the Ohara Institute for Social Research in Tokyo from 2001 to 2002. He earned a master's degree from the University of Iowa and a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Kristen Intemann is an assistant professor of philosophy. Intemann earned a Ph.D. and master's degree from the University of Washington and a bachelor's degree from the University of Iowa. Her areas of specialization are applied ethics, philosophy of science and feminist philosophy. She is also interested in other ethical issues in science and public policy, especially in the areas of biomedical ethics and environmental ethics.

Christina Jeffrey is a visiting associate professor of politics. She earned a Ph.D. from the University of Alabama. Her specialty is public policy, and she has taught introductory as well as upper and graduate level courses. Jeffrey has two works in process, "Why Johnny Still Can't Read" and "The Talented Tenth: How We Treat Independent Black Americans." She has also written articles on public policy for The Wall Street Journal, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution and various other publications.

Scott Pleasant, a visiting instructor of English, earned a master's degree from East Tennessee State University. He is a doctoral candidate at Auburn University and his areas of specialization are 20th century literature, linguistics and critical theory. He has taught English at East Tennessee State and Auburn University.

Ryan Shelley, a visiting instructor of English, earned a master's degree from Winthrop University. He is a doctoral candidate at the University of South Carolina, majoring in composition and rhetoric. He was an instructor of English at U.S.C. while working on his doctorate, and he has written for The Loris Scene.

College of Natural and Applied Sciences Karen M. Aguirre is an assistant biology professor who will teach courses in cell biology and immunology. She earned a Ph.D. from Princeton University and a bachelor's degree from Hunter College of City University of New York. She was a postdoctoral fellow at Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake, N.Y. Her research dealt with investigating the inflammatory response of Cryptococcus neoformans in the central nervous system.

Clara N. Brown joins the department of mathematics and statistics as a lecturer. She earned a M.B.A. in management from Augusta College and a master's degree in mathematics from the University of Charleston. Brown has business experience, and she has taught in the public school system.

Suzanne G. Charnick joins the faculty as an assistant professor of chemistry. She will teach courses in introductory chemistry and chemical education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in cooperation with the Spadoni College of Education. She is expected to earn a Ph.D. at the University of Northern Colorado this year. Charnick earned a bachelor's degree from the University of California.

Crystal C. Edge is an instructor of computer applications and introductory computer science courses. She earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Coastal and a master's degree from Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. She has been a programmer with Horry Telephone Cooperative.

Robin M. Gilbert is an assistant professor of psychology. She earned a master's degree and Ph.D. from Hofstra University. Most recently she was a school psychologist in the Kyrene School district in Tempe, Ariz.

Kevin S. Godwin, a wetland/landscape ecologist, joins the faculty as an assistant professor who will teach courses in ecology and wetland science. Godwin is working on a Ph.D. from SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-CESF) in wetland ecology/landscape ecology/conservation biology. Godwin's dissertation research is on landscape characteristics responsible for the formation and persistence of small, floristically diverse, groundwater-fed wetlands.

Thomas R. Hoffman is an assistant professor in computational algebra. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona, a master's degree from Oregon State University, and a bachelor's degree from Western Oregon State College. His research interests include the representation theory of finite groups, computational group theory, linear algebra and group cohomology.

Eric B. Howington, an assistant professor, will teach courses in statistics. He is working toward a Ph.D. in applied statistics at the University of Alabama. He earned master's and bachelor's degrees from the University of Alabama. Research interests include statistical computing, exploratory data analysis, data mining, outlier detection and evolutionary algorithms.

Brent L. Lewis will join the Department of Marine Science as an associate professor beginning Spring 2005. He comes from Kettering University where he taught in the environmental chemistry division. His expertise is in the area of trace metal cycling and speciation. He earned a master's degree and a Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from Florida State University.

Sasha L. Logan, an assistant professor in applied mathematics, will teach courses in discrete mathematics. She earned a Ph.D., master's and bachelor's degrees from Auburn University. Her research area is discrete mathematics with emphasis in graph theory and combinatorial design theory.

Paul E. Richardson, a biochemist, is an assistant professor who will teach courses in biochemistry, biology and bioinformatics. He is expected to earn a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular genetics at the University of Alabama this summer. He earned a master's degree from the University of Southern Maine and a bachelor's degree from Lebanon Valley College.

Moninya Roughan, a coastal physical oceanographer, will join the faculty as an assistant professor beginning Spring 2005. She comes from Scripps Institution of Oceanography where she has been a postdoctoral researcher. She earned a Ph.D. from University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.

Kerry A. Schwanz joins the faculty as an assistant professor of psychology. She earned a bachelor's degree from USC-Coastal and a master's and Ph.D. from the University of Georgia. She has been employed by Horry County Schools as a certified school psychologist. Her most recent research includes collecting and analyzing data to develop summary reports for the purpose of reporting the progress of the school district's problem-solving pilot program to the State Department of Education.

Darlene L. Slusher is an assistant professor who will teach courses in introductory chemistry, chemical education, kinetics and thermodynamics. She earned doctorate, master's and bachelor's degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Slusher has been a postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., where she has been developing inquiry-based secondary school environmental science activities using data visualization and analysis software.

James P. Solazzo is an assistant professor in mathematics. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Houston in 2000 and was a postdoctoral associate and visiting assistant professor at the University of Georgia. Solazzo earned a master's degree from the University of Houston and a bachelor's degree from the State University of New York (SUNY). His research interests are operator algebras/theory and interpolation problems in classical function theory.

Stephanie Welter is a visiting assistant professor who will teach courses in zoology and ecology. She is expected to earn a Ph.D. in evolution, ecology and behavior from Indiana University this year. She earned a bachelor's degree from Denison University. Her dissertation was titled "Environmental and Genetic Influences on Plasticity in Background Matching in Larval Two-lined Salamander, Eurycera cirrigera."

Donald E. Yessick will be an assistant professor beginning Spring 2005. He earned a master's degree and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Alabama. His current research interests are in bioinformatics, software engineering and selected graph problems.

Search Options:
Select Specific Year(s):
2014 2006
2013 2005
2012 2004
2011 2003
2010 2002
2009 2001
2008 2000
2007
View ALL Archived News
 
Link to CCU Home Page
University Policies | Site Policies | Contact Us
© 2014 Coastal Carolina University | P.O. Box 261954, Conway, SC 29528-6054 | +1 843-347-3161