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Women in Philanthropy

Giving circles are small networks in which individuals pool their contributions and decide collectively how they should be distributed; they have become an important part of the American philanthropic tradition. The Impact of Giving Together, a 2009 study of giving circles in the U.S. found that donors, particularly women, who participate in collective giving give more than other donors, give more strategically, and give to a greater number of organizations.

As a result of participation in giving circles, women's knowledge about philanthropy, nonprofits and their communities increases. Thanks to higher levels of education and, in turn, higher incomes, women's capacity for philanthropy has greatly increased in the past half century. According to research, women at virtually every income level are more likely to give to charity and to give more money on average than their male counterparts. Women also give to organizations where they can see a return on their investment –where they can be involved in witnessing change.

An investment in Women in Philanthropy and Leadership for Coastal Carolina University will provide a significant positive impact to the community in the form of increased retention and graduation of our students, who will, in turn, provide leadership in their communities and to society.

Resources of interest 

The article, "Lack of Women in Top Roles Hinders Nonprofits, Female Nonprofit Workers Say," reports on a study based on a poll of nonprofit employees that was commissioned by the Chronicle of Philanthropy and New York University’s George H. Heyman, Jr. Center for Philanthropy and Fundraising.

The following reports are from the Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy that focus on gender differences in giving to charity.

Women Give 2013

Women Give 2012

2011 Study of High Net Worth Women’s Philanthropy
and the Impact of Women’s Giving Networks