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Eliza Glaze, professor of history, is the 2019 HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Lecturer

January 30, 2019
History Professor Eliza Glaze has received the 2019 HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Lecturer award for 2019.

History Professor Eliza Glaze has received the 2019 HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Lecturer award in recognition of her outstanding teaching, intensive scholarly research and concern for student learning.

Glaze has been with CCU since 2003 and has served as co-director of the University Honors Program, the chair of the Department of History, and the Lawrence B. and Jane P. Clark Endowed Chair in History, a three-year appointment. She has earned major research awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Humanities Center, among others.

She has presented by invitation at nine conferences in the past three years in addition to traveling to Paris, Oxford and Leiden to advance her research of the history of Western medicine. She teaches courses at CCU on manuscripts and archives, the Byzantine Empire, the Crusades, and the history of Western medicine. In some of these courses, Glaze has incorporated the “Reacting to the Past” pedagogy that assigns students historical roles to provide a deeper understanding of historical events and that has a significant impact on student learning, as it goes beyond the traditional lecture format of classroom instruction.

“Her willingness to evaluate her success in the classroom shows that she seeks to reach all students and all learning styles,” said Brandon Palmer, chair of the CCU Department of History. “She has also nurtured undergraduate research, as evidenced by her supervision of one-on-one senior thesis classes, her preparation of students in her courses for conference presentations, and her organization of archival trips for her upper-level students.”

As the winner of this award, made possible through a generous donation from HTC, Glaze will present a public lecture on her recent research of the history of medicine and pharmacy, the changing nature of mercantile activity and commodity exchange in the medieval Mediterranean, and the entrance of Greek and Arabic medical knowledge into the Latin West. The presentation, titled “A Taste of Paradise: Medicine, Trade, and Consumption in the pre-Modern Mediterranean,” will take place at CCU in early April.

Glaze said her lecture will pull together various strands of knowledge from the scientific, commercial, pedagogical and conceptual realms of the pre-modern Mediterranean to pinpoint when new medicinal processes began. She has spoken on this topic at Duke University and King’s College in London, and has two presentations scheduled for 2019, one at the Center for the Study of the Early Middle Ages in Spoleto, Italy, and the other at the Royal Netherlands Institute in Rome.

“Using her research in the history of medicine, Glaze intends to share a story that combines history, science and the communication of ideas,” says Dan Ennis, dean of the Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts. “This award is reserved for the best faculty in this University, in that it requires scholarly acumen and superior presentation skills. Glaze possesses both.”

Recent HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Lecturers include Jen Boyle (English, 2018), John Hutchens (biology, 2017), Rob Young (marine science, 2016), Pam Martin (politics, 2015) and Terry Pettijohn II (psychology, 2014). The award has been given annually since 1996.