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Course Descriptions

COMMUNICATION (COMM)

COMM 101 Introduction to Communication (3) This course introduces students to the study of communication, its history, theories and principles and serves to improve critical thinking, perception and communicative awareness.

COMM 140 Oral Communication (3) The theory and practice of interpersonal, small group, and public oral communication, to include performance by students.

COMM 274 Organizational Communication (3) (Prereq: COMM 101) Examines communication systems and communication flow in formal organizations and deals with communication climate, leadership, work control systems networks and performance enhancement and evaluation.

COMM 275 Communication Theory (3) (Prereq: COMM 101) This course provides an in-depth survey of theories and relevant criticism in communication and prepares students for theoretical application in research and thesis preparation.

COMM 276 Communication Research (3) (Prereq: COMM 101) This course prepares students early for research; how to isolate problem statements, distinguish independent and dependent variables, criticize and evaluate definitions, define theories, understand how to apply methods of sound research (qualitative and quantitative), collected data and analyze scholarly articles.

COMM 302 Communication Law & Ethics (3) (Prereq: COMM 101) This is a course in legal cases and ethical issues as they apply to communication problems, precedents and negligence or oversight in corporations and organizations.

COMM 304 Gender Communication (3) Gender Communication inquires into the connections among four areas of study: gender, identity, culture, and communication.  Students explore the multiple ways that gender roles are created and sustained through communication in such contexts as families, schools, the workplace, and the media.

COMM 311 Health Communication (3) This course provides students with an overview of the various areas of studies within the health communication field.  Students will explore multiple communication issues relevant to health including language, information processing, the social construction of health and illness, patient-doctor communication, and the mutually influential relationships among health care professionals, patients, friends and family members, and cultural institutions.

COMM 330 Communication and Technology (3) (Prereq: COMM 101 or JOUR 201) This course offers a broad survey of communication and technology with an emphasis on the relationship between the medium and the message.  Topics covered are the diffusion of technologies, theoretical and historical and philosophical perspectives on the use of communication tools, and the implications for individuals and society.

COMM 334 Small Group Communication (3) (Prereq: COMM 140 or ENGL 390) The study and practice of small group communication through creative approaches to problem solving.

COMM 340 Media Effects (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201) This course examines the use and effects of media for individuals and societies.  It will cover topics such as: what media content affects people, the types of people who are affected by media content, what those effects are and how they occur, and what situations makes effects more or less likely to occur.

COMM 341 Advanced Public Speaking (3) (Prereq: COMM 140) Analysis and advanced applications of public discourse and discursive strategies with emphasis on speech structure and delivery methods.

COMM 345 Communication Activism (3) (Prereq: Juniors and Seniors only and successful completion of 60 credit hours) This seminar requires students to work with non-governmental, governmental and/or grass roots advocacy groups engaging in public service, social justice, and/or other applied communication projects often now collectively referred to as Communicaiton Activism.  Utilizing a variety of communication skills - including but not limited to message design for foundational, educational, and/or preventive campaigns - students will research, publicize, advocate against, and/or intervene in a social justice project with a community service organization.  This is an active, intensive course that combines service learning with perspectives and practices from communication, health promotion, socual science, and journalism.  As such, this course is designed for students committed to social activism.

COMM 374 Organizational Communication Simulation (3) (Prereq: COMM 274) This course is designed to help students develop and apply organizational communication skills that will be useful in a variety of professional settings.  These skills involve conducting human resource training sessions, taking and conducting employment interviews, group decision making, organizational consulting, and written/oral reporting.  In a larger sense, this course is about how communication functions to create and sustain organizations.  This course continues the study or organizational start in the introductory course COMM 274 is more application based.

COMM 399 Independent Study in Communication (3) Designed for advanced a self-motivated students, Communication 399, Independent Study in Communication, allows students to conduct scholarly work in an academic area not offered in the traditional course format.  The course will result in a document, performance, or body of work that reflects the student’s research or summarizes the knowledge synthesized during a structured, sequenced order of study.

COMM 410 Special Topics in Communication (3) This course is an active, intensive seminar that allows students to explore, on an advanced level, a special topic within communication.  Special topics include community, communication, and health; rhetoric, culture, and social change; and gender, performance, and identity; among others.

COMM 411 Health and the Media (3) (Prereq: COMM 311) This course emphasizes media-based health messages, focusing specifically on messages depicted in television dramas, films/movies, news, and the Internet.  The course focuses on health communication campaigns, as well as the application of health communication theory and strategy to campaign messages in order to maximize message effectiveness.  This course is intended for a future health care professional, health communication professional or health care consumer.

COMM 412 Interpersonal Health Communication (3) (Prereq: COMM 311) This course explores the interpersonal contexts of health communication, including patient-provider communication, social support, communication in illness, family communication about health, interpersonal communication and technology, and everyday talk about health.  It is appropriate for the future health care professional, health communication student, or health care consumer.

COMM 470 Communication and Conflict Management (3) (Prereq: COMM 101 or permission of the instructor) This is an upper-level undergraduate course designed to explore conflict management, the underlying causes of conflict, and the available communication strategies for handling them.  This course introduces positive conflict management processes, including active listening, principle negotiation, mediation, and nonviolent direct action.  We will be looking at conflict leterature from a communication perspective.  The class will be conducted in a lecture/simulation/seminar format.  The simulation and seminar part of the class is designed to encourage exploration or various conflict situations such as friendship, business, multicultural, experimental learning so numerous in-class simulations will allow students to experiment with conflict techniques and strategies.

COMM 491 Communication Capstone: Thesis (3) (Prereq: COMM 275, 276) Students synthesize coursework previously conducted within the major, apply their knowledge and education to a significant research topic; and produce a thesis.  They gain an understoanding of how to compose/construct a theoretically driven thesis; refine their research library skills; and understand how to use proper documentation style.

COMM 492 Communication Capstone: Project (3) (Prereq: COMM 275, 276) Students apply their knowledge and education to a significant research project involving the student's communication research interest.  The course project can be an external (community) or internal (within the University) project.  Each project is outlined in a customized course syllabus with an outline of the work to be completed by the student.

COMM 495 Communication Internship (3) (Prereq: COMM 101, COMM 274, and at least 90 credit hours) The guided internship requires 120 hours of on-site work, a journal, and a final paper. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical application opportunities for their knowledge and skills, to introduce them to local and regional employers in their field of study, and to enhance networking opportunities.

 

FRENCH (FREN)

FREN 110 Introductory French I. (3) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing.

FREN 111 Introductory French I-II (Intensive). (3) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, Equivalent to French 110-120. Intended for students with two years of high school French with an average grade of B or better, or by placement.

FREN 120 Introductory French II. (3) (Prereq: FREN 110 or by placement) A continuation of French 110. Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. 

FREN 130 Introductory French III. (3) (Prereq: FREN 120, FREN 111 or by placement) Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. 

FREN 210 Intermediate French Language and Culture I. (3) (Prereq: FREN 130 or equivalent) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading. 

FREN 220 Intermediate French Language and Culture II. (3) (Prereq: FREN 210) Intensive review of fundamental language skills and preview of advanced level skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading. 

FREN 225 French Conversation I. (1) (Prereq: FREN 130 or equivalent) Intensive practice in intermediate spoken French. 

FREN 250 French Literature in Translation. (3) (Prereq: C or better in ENGL 101) Selected readings of French literature from the Middle Ages to the Modern Era in Translation. Discussion and analysis of a variety of texts, including prose, drama, and poetry, and consideration of their cultural and historical backgrounds. Work for the class includes reading assignments, short critical essays, and comparative studies of the works read. 

FREN 310 French Grammar and Composition. (3) (Prereq: FREN 220 or equivalent) Intensive practice in French grammar and composition. Students should also register for FREN 325. 

FREN 311 French Conversation. (3) (Prereq: FREN 210 or equivalent) Intensive practice in spoken French. 

FREN 316 French Phonetics. (3) (Prereq: FREN 210 or equivalent) A course in pronunciation of French with attention to correction of difficulties encountered by English speakers. Students will make regular use of the language laboratory. 

FREN 325 French Conversation II. (1) (Prereq: FREN 220 or equivalent) Intensive practice in advanced spoken French. 

FREN 350 French Language Study Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: Approval by Foreign Language faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Chair of the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment. 

FREN 390 Introduction to French Literature I. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or equivalent) A survey of French literature from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. 

FREN 391 Introduction to French Literature II. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or equivalent) A survey of French literature of the 19th century and 20th century. 

FREN 399 Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: A written contract between the student and instructor for a special topic dealing with French language or culture, and approved by the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the French Minor Core. May be repeated for credits under different topics. 

FREN 400 French Civilization. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or equivalent) Practice in oral and written French through a study of the culture, history and development of France from its beginnings to the present day. Students should also register for FREN 425. 

FREN 401 La France Contemporaine. (3) (Prereq: FREN 310 or equivalent) Reading and discussions on the culture of contemporary France. 

FREN 415 French Linguistics. (3) (Prereq: FREN 210 or equivalent) Presentation and evaluation of various linguistic models and their application to the teaching of French. 

FREN 425 Advanced Composition in French. (1) (Prereq: FREN 310 ) Development of advanced writing skills in French. 

FREN 448 Teaching of French. (3) (Prereq: Permission of the Department Chair) Study of the latest methodologies, theories, and materials for teaching modern languages. 

FREN 495 Internship. (3) (Prereq: FREN 350 or special permission) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the Department Chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the Department Chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties – the student faculty supervisor, Chair of the Department, and the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.

 

GERMAN (GERM)

GERM 110 Introductory German I. (3) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. 

GERM 111 Introductory German I -II (Intensive). (3) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, Equivalent to German 110-120. Intended for students with two years of high school German with an average of B or better, or by placement. 

GERM 120 Introductory German II. (3) (Prereq: GERM 110 or by placement) A continuation of German 110. Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. 

GERM 130 Introductory German III. (3) (Prereq: GERM 120, GERM 111, or by placement) Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. 

GERM 210 Intermediate German I. (3) (Prereq: GERM 130 or by placement) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework, with particular emphasis on reading. 

GERM 310 German Grammar and Composition. (3) (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the Department) Intensive practice in German grammar and composition. 

GERM 311 German Conversation. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 and permission of the Department) Intensive practice in spoken German. 

GERM 350 German Language Study Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: Approval by Foreign Language faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment. 

GERM 390 Introduction to German Literature I. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the Department) Reading and discussion of representative works of German prose, drama, and lyric poetry from Germanic times through the late eighteenth century. 

GERM 391 Introduction to German Literature II. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the Department Chair) Reading and discussion of representative works of German prose, drama, and lyric poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

GERM 398 Selected Topics in Translation. (3) (Prereq: permission of the department) Selected topics in German literature and culture. Readings in English; topics announced in advance. May be repeated for credit under different topics. 

GERM 399 Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: A written contract between the student and the instructor for a special topic dealing with German language or culture, and approved by the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the German Minor Core. May be repeated for credit under different topics. 

GERM 400 German Civilization. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the department) A broad survey of German civilization and cultural history from the Germanic origins through the Third Reich/World War II. 

GERM 401 Contemporary Germany. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the department) An in-depth examination of the civilization and cultural life of post-war Germany with additional consideration of Austria and Switzerland. 

GERM 405 Topics in German. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the department) Reading and discussion on selected topics in German language, literature, and culture. May be repeated for credit under different topics. 

GERM 415 German Linguistics and Phonology. (3) (Prereq: GERM 210 or equivalent; permission of the department) An overview of the history of the German language and introduction to German phonology, with an emphasis on teaching applications. 

GERM 448 Teaching of German. (3) (Prereq: permission of the department) Study of the latest methodologies, theories, and materials for teaching modern languages. 

GERM 495 Internship. (3) (Prereq: GERM 350 or special permission) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the Department Chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the Department Chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties – the student faculty supervisor, Chair of the Department, and the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.

 

ITALIAN (ITAL)

ITAL 110 Introductory Italian. (3) For students with no or very limited background in Italian. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Development of reading and writing skills. 

ITAL 120 Introductory Italian II. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 110 or equivalent) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Italian culture. 

ITAL 130 Introductory Italian III. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 120 or equivalent) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Italian through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Italian culture. 

ITAL 210 Intermediate Italian I. (3) (Prereq: ITAL 130 or permission of the instructor) Intensive review of fundamental language skills in preparation for advanced-level coursework.

JAPANESE (JAPN)

JAPN 110 Introductory Japanese I. (3) For students with no or very limited background in Japanese. Emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture. 

JAPN 120 Introductory Japanese II. (3) (Prereq: JAPN 110 or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture. 

JAPN 130 Introductory Japanese III. (3) (Prereq: JAPN 120 or by placement) Continued emphasis on the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese through intensive conversational exercise and practice. Further development of reading and writing skills. Introduction to Japanese culture. 

JAPN 350 Japanese Language Study Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: JAPN 130) (Coreq: approval of the Chair of World Languages and Cultures) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program, students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Chair of the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment.

 

JOURNALISM (JOUR)
Journalism Minor Webpage

JOUR 200 Journalism (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101,102) This course educates students in the basics of writing and design in mass media. It prepares students in writing for newspapers and magazines and, at the same time, provides basic skills knowledge in layout and design of newspapers, newsletters, flyers, posters, etc. It is meant to be the prerequisite for all courses in the journalism minor.

JOUR 201 Foundations of Journalism and Mass Communication (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101,102) Survey of the history and principles of print journalism and the broadcast communications industry, concentrating on their development, philosophical foundations, processes, economics, influences on society, and directions for the future.

JOUR 304 Writing for Interactive Journalism (3) (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: ENGL 101,  JOUR 200) This course builds on the basic journalism writing skills acquired in JOUR 200 through the addition of specialty reporting skills and the knowledge of interactive tools.  Students will practice and refine their writing skills.  Students will also learn the basic use of online reporting tools including social media video shooting, and editing basics.  Classroom exercises will emphasize proper grammar, quality writing, and multi-media storytelling.

JOUR 305 Journalism Writing for News Media (3) (Writing Intensive) (Prereq: ENGL 101, JOUR 200 or 201) Workshop on news media (both in paper and web format).  Emphasis placed on writing news features, hard vs. soft news pieces and profiles for audiences of both newspapers and web news venues that include photography or video links.

JOUR 306 Journalism Law and Ethics (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201) The legal history and philosophy of the media in light of the First Amendment, including discussion of libel and slander laws, shield laws, the Freedom of Information Act, privacy laws, and other issues affecting the rights and responsibilities of the media.

JOUR 307 Copy Editing (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201, 304) A rigorous workshop designed to develop editing skills. Students learn to catch fact, style, and grammar errors in copy; tighten and rewrite stories, create headlines, and manage deadlines.

JOUR 308 Public Opinion and Propaganda (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201) This course offers historical analyses of propaganda as persuasive communication and explores how public opinion and propaganda impact each other and society. S, odd years.

JOUR 309 Introduction to Public Relations (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201) A survey course in the concepts, strategies, and tactics of public relations as a career field and as it relates to journalism, advertising, and marketing. S, odd years.

JOUR 310 Writing for Broadcast (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101, 102; JOUR 201) This course offers students an introduction to broadcast media as well as reporting. Students learn components of script writing, videotape editing and the impact of broadcast. S.

JOUR 312 Media Relations (3) (Prereq: JOUR 304, JOUR 309) The goal of this course is to instruct students in the art of writing for the mass media in clear, concise, simple language that transmits information and ideas while keeping in mind news values of timliness, proximity, relevance and immediacy. Students learn what they must do to attract the media to news about an organization they might one day represent.

JOUR 314 Video Journalism Production (3) (Prereq: JOUR 304 or JOUR 310) This course introduces students to video journalism production, from newsgathering in the field to the final edited product for broadcast.  Students are exposed to working in reporter/photographer teams similar to the broadcast news industry.

JOUR 316 Entertainment Media (3) This course examines the entertainment and network industry in Hollywood, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, and countries around the world.  Entertainment industry includes television networks as well as movie studios.  Topics and fields of study include casting, development script coverage and script analysis.  Also the couse may cover location shooting, career choices int eh industry and comparison of the biographies of writers, directors, and producers in the media intertainment industry.  Moreover students leave the course with a thorough understanding of the operation and management of the entertainment (network) industry.

JOUR 317 Television Studio Production (3) (Prereq: JOUR 200 or JOUR 201 or permission of the instructor) This course introduces students to the practive of television studio production with a special emphasis on the roles of producing and directing.  Set designs and lighting plot plans are thoroughly examined and determined for each production whether for broadcast, cable, corporate media, community media productions or not-for-profit organizations.  Studio crew positions including assistant director, floor director, camera operator, switcher, video recorder, audio engineer and graphics operator are rotated for each assignment to make students aware of their specific techniques.  Projects are completed in a real-time environment.  Post-production is not considered for this class.

JOUR 319 Public Relations Practice (3) (Prereq: JOUR 309) This course is a study of best practices in public relations that provides a comprehensive overview of strategic principles applied by various organizations.  Students will gain a broad understanding of the public relations field and refine their skills in creating messages and making oral presentations.

JOUR 350 Interactive Media and Society (3) This course offers an overview of interactive media, with an emphasis on participatory and social practices surrounding information and entertainment.  The material covered reflects sustained trends in journalism, media, and society.  Topics may include the history and evolution of media from analog to digital formats; new motels for journalism, news, creativity, production and consumption; and the outcomes, implications and consequences for culture and organizations.

JOUR 365 Women and Media (3) This is a survey course about the history of women's roles in the media, their contributions, employment, and media effects on women.

JOUR 419 Strategic Communication Campaigns (3) This is an in-depth and applied study of the strategic communication process, including research, planning, implementation, and evaluation.  The course is designed specifically to provide experiential learning opportunities as students work in teams to develop a campaign.

JOUR 450 Senior Seminar (3) (Prereq: Completion of 90 credit hours) This course is a narrow, but in depth examination of a topic in media studies.  The topic shold be one either not covered in other courses or only surveyed.  Course material will focus on relevant research and theory.

JOUR 489 Journalism Special Topics Seminar (3) (Prereq: ENGL 101, 102; JOUR 201 or permission of instructor) Exact topics will vary, but each will be an interdisciplinary seminar emphasizing the relationships between journalism, mass media, and various aspects of society. The course may be repeated for Journalism elective credit.

JOUR 495 Journalism Internship (3) (Prereq: JOUR 201, 304, and 305) Students will receive professional experience and instruction in a substantial internship while working 10 hours per week with a local media organization. Contracts outlining content, supervision and grading criteria must be approved in advance by the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts.

 

SPANISH (SPAN)

SPAN 110 Introductory Spanish. (3) Development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), with additional consideration of culture. 

SPAN 111 Introductory Spanish I - II (Intensive). (3) Fundamentals of the language through aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, with additional consideration of culture. Intensive review of first and second semester Spanish language course intended for students with two years of high school Spanish with an average of B or better, or by placement. SPAN 111 and SPAN 130 must be taken in sequence and completed with appropriate grades to fulfill Goal 5-A of the Core Curriculum. 

SPAN 120 Introductory Spanish II. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 110 or by placement) A continuation of Spanish 110. Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. 

SPAN 130 Introductory Spanish III. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 120, SPAN 111, or by placement) Further development of fundamental language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), with additional consideration of culture. 

SPAN 210 Conversation/Composition I. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 130 or by placement) Develops an intermediate proficiency in Spanish and an appreciation of Hispanic cultures through practice in the use of the basic language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Emphasis on the expansion and refinement of oral and written skills. Reading and discussion of a variety of literary and nonliterary texts of appropriate difficulty. Grammar review. Required for work in upper level language, literature, and culture courses.

SPAN 211 Conversation/Composition II. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) This course continues and complements the first semester intermediate level Spanish (SPAN 210; Conversation/Composition I). Further expansion of language skills and appreciation of Hispanic cultures. Additional emphasis on grammar review in preparation for work in upper-level courses. 

SPAN 315 Advanced Spanish Grammar. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 211) Intensive grammar review and writing practice.

SPAN 320 Spanish for the Professions. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) Study of the applied nature of the language focusing on the cultural aspects and specialized vocabulary of a given professional field. Emphasis on developing skills to ask and answer questions relating to a particular professional field, drafting relevant documents, and describing events that may arise in the practice of the profession. The following are among the possible professional fields on which the course will focus: a) Spanish for Business; b) Spanish for Health Professions; c) Spanish for Public Safety; d) Spanish for the Travel and Tourism Industry. 

SPAN 321 Conversations on Hispanic Current Events. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) This course is designed to promote an active command of the language and an appreciation of the cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world. Topics that emerge from the media serve as a basis for conversations, class presentations, and essays. This course is not for native or heritage speakers of Spanish.

SPAN 322 Latin American Literature in Translation. (3) (=ENGL 322) (Prereq: for Spanish credit: SPAN 210) (Writing Intensive) Selected readings of Latin American Literature in translation. Students write primarily critical essays. All readings are in English. 

SPAN 323 Spanish for Business and Tourism. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) This course provides students with linguistic skills necessary to discuss business concepts and the tourism industry in Spanish. Emphasis is placed on developing the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) in the context of business situations. Special consideration is devoted to acquiring an appreciation and understanding of Hispanic culture in the business world.

SPAN 326 Cuban Literature in Translation. (1-3) (=LATS 326) (Prereq: SPAN 130 and permission of the instructor) (Coreq: Travel/study in Cuba) Selected readings in Cuban literature in translation. Students will read, research and write on Cuban literature, society and culture. A non-refundable deposit is required upon registration. 

SPAN 330 Approaches to Literature and Culture. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) Introductory studies in the literature and cultural manifestations of the Hispanic world. Authors, genres, or cultural expressions may vary. Emphasis on the continued development of oral, reading, and writing skills.

SPAN 333 Topics in Language, Literature, and Culture. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) Selective study of topics in the language, literature, and culture of Latin America and Spain. Course format includes reading assignments, lectures, discussion, oral and written reports. Topics vary. 

SPAN 340 Hispanic Culture and Civilization. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 210) A study of the historical development and various cultural manifestations of the Spanish, Latin American, and contemporary Hispanic civilization. 

SPAN 350 Spanish Language Study Abroad. (3-6) (Prereq: Approval of Communication, Languages and Cultures faculty) Language study abroad with instruction by native speakers. Credit hours granted dependent on the number of hours taken. Upon successful completion of an approved program students must furnish a certificate and/or examination results. Prior consultation with the Department of Communication, Languages and Cultures is mandatory before enrollment.

SPAN 360 Studies in Hispanic Poetry. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 211) (Writing Intensive) Selected topics in Hispanic poetry. This course is designed to develop students' appreciation of poetry and to develop critical approaches to poetic texts. Periods covered may include the following: Renaissance and Baroque Poetry of Spain, Modern Spanish Poetry, and Poetry of Latin America from Modernism to the present. 

SPAN 380 Studies in World Film. (3) (=THEA 380) This course is a survey of world film with an emphasis on Hispanic cinema. It provides a general introduction to contemporary film-critical discourses which are currently under the rubric of film semiotics. Key elements of the language of cinema are studied with the goal of developing both critical and creative skills. Taught in English. 

SPAN 399 Independent Study. (3) (Prereq: a written contract between students and instructor for a special topic dealing with Spanish language or culture, and approved by the Dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts) May not be used to satisfy the Spanish Minor Core.

SPAN 410 Spanish Peninsular Literature. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 340) A survey of the major literary works of Spain from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. 

SPAN 411 Spanish American Literature. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 340) A survey of the major literary works of Spanish American from pre-Columbian times through the twentieth century. 

SPAN 430 Spanish Linguistics. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 340) Study of modern Spanish with attention to the application of linguistic theory to the effective teaching of Spanish.

SPAN 431 Advanced Language Study. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 340) (Writing Intensive) Intensive practice of oral skills. Advanced study of grammar, syntax, and composition. Emphasis on mastery of complex language structures. Oral and written examinations.

SPAN 480 Capstone: Advanced Topics in Literature and Culture. (3) (Prereq: SPAN 340 or equivalent) (Writing Intensive) Intensive study and analysis of a notable author or authors, literary trends or selected cultural topics. Emphasis may be placed on one or more of the various forms of artistic, cultural or linguistic expressions. 

SPAN 495 Internship. (3) (Prereq: permission of the Department Chair) This is a guided internship and requires 120 hours of outside work, a journal, and a final evaluation paper. Students must have permission of the Department Chair before applying for internship. Application for the internship can be obtained without receiving permission from the Department Chair. Students are professionally supervised in an organization while working 120 hours during a semester (12 weeks at 10 hours per week). The application states the course’s objective, requirements, and grading procedures. A contract between the student and the facility or organization where the internship will take place is signed by all parties – the student faculty supervisor, Chair of the Department, and the Dean of the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts. During the internship period, students are required to maintain a journal. Interim and final reports are sent to the organization by the coordinator of internships.