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April | Lectures

AN EVENING WITH GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING
COMPOSER MARIA SCHNEIDER

Monday, April 2, 7:30 p.m.

Five-time Grammy-winning composer and big-band leader Maria Schneider presents a lecture about her music, career and advocacy. Schneider is an internationally renowned composer who works primarily with the NYC-based Maria Schneider Jazz Orchestra. She is the first Grammy recipient for a “crowd-funded” album, Concert in the Garden (2004), produced by ArtistShare, and has been an influential advocate for musicians’ rights and copyright.

Edwards Recital Hall
Admission: Free and open to the public
(A ticket is required for entry.)

 
The Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values

TEA AND ETHICS

TRANSGENDERNESS AND COLLEGE LIFE

Thursday, April 5, 4:30 p.m. 

CCU students, faculty, staff and administrators present a panel discussion exploring questions and issues involved in being transgender in today’s college environment. Questions to be addressed include: What does daily life entail for transgender students, faculty members and staff members at CCU? What CCU policies are beneficial or problematic for transgender individuals? What CCU services are available for transgender students?

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of English

OUT OF CONTEXT, IN YOUR HEART:
SOME THOUGHTS ON NARRATOLOGY OF THE MOMENT

Thursday, April 5, 6 p.m.

Narrative theorist Peter Rabinowitz, professor of comparative literature at Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., presents a lecture exploring “narrative flavor” – those favorite moments we all have in novels (and films and music) to which we return again and again. Traditional academic practice insists on the priority of the whole; a moment is considered to have value only in the context of a larger narrative structure. As a result, we tend to treat these favorite bits as guilty pleasures. However, Rabinowitz attempts to liberate some of those beloved passages in an attempt to understand why certain moments affect us the way they do. His emphasis is on a group of moments that provide a special kind of temporal vertigo, but his argument allows for analysis of other moments as well.

Edwards Recital Hall
Admission: Free and open to the public

The Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values

VISITING ETHICIST

SELF-TRANSCENDENCE AND THE MEANING OF LIFE

Thursday, April 19, 4:30 p.m. 

Jennifer Frey, professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina and 2018 visiting ethicist of CCU’s Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values, presents a lecture on human perspective and life satisfaction. She argues that self-transcendence, or an individual’s ability to relate to questions beyond his or her own self-concern, is a crucial component in a virtuous and happy life.

Frey holds a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh; her academic research is focused on questions at the intersection of virtue ethics, philosophy of action and theories of rationality.

Wall Boardroom, Room 222
Admission: Free and open to the public

‌‌‌The Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies 

NIKKY FINNEY: WELCOME HOME

Friday, April 20, 7 p.m.

Poet, educator, advocate and National Book Award-winner Nikky Finney returns to her native city of Conway, S.C., to address the Conway and CCU communities in a keynote lecture for the Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies. Finney will present an inaugural reading of her poem commissioned by the Joyner Institute.

Finney’s national acclaim includes a 20-year tenure as the Guy Davenport Endowed Professor of English at the University of Kentucky; since 2013, Finney has been the John H. Bennett Jr. Endowed Professor of Creative Writing and Southern Letters at the University of South Carolina, with appointments in both the Department of English Language and Literature and the African American Studies program. Her 2011 acceptance speech for the National Book Award for Poetry — awarded for Head Off & Split — has become nationally renowned and is on display along with her work in both print and video form at the African American Museum of History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

The Joyner Institute examines the historical migration and scattering of African populations to local geographical areas and the subsequent evolution of blended cultures, specifically Gullah. The work of the institute provides students with experiential learning opportunities, both at home and abroad, that center on interconnections among local, national, and global peoples and their societies.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public