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February | Lectures

‌Department of History and Department of Anthropology and Geography

CULTURAL HERITAGE VISITING SCHOLARS SERIES

Monuments and Memorials:
Art and History in Public Spaces

Thursday, Feb. 1, 5:15 p.m.

Modupe Labode, associate professor of history and museum studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, speaks on the interpretation of art and historical monuments in modern public space. Who determines what monuments dominate public spaces? What should happen to Confederate monuments? How do public art displays affect the interpretation of history in the public? Labode’s work includes explorations in public history, art history, and monuments and memorials. She is writing a manuscript about Fred Wilson’s public art project along the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, E Pluribus Unum, which was terminated due to public protest.

Edwards Building, Room 248
Admission: Free and open to the public
(no ticket required)

Edgar Dyer Institute for Leadership and Public Policy, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute,
and Department of Politics

Great Decisions in Foreign Policy Lecture Series

Saturday, Feb. 3, 10, 17 and 24
Coffee social: 9:30 a.m.; lecture: 10 a.m. to noon

The Great Decisions program is designed to offer discussion, debate and information about international affairs, national security and U.S. foreign policy. Great Decisions is the oldest and largest grassroots world affairs educational program of its kind in the country, and audience members will gain a deeper understanding of the challenges the United States faces in the world today. Lecture topics include Media and Foreign Policy; Turkey: A Partner in Crisis; U.S. Global Engagement and the Military; and Global Health: Progress and Challenges.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public
(no ticket required)
 

Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values

Thinking about the Gap in Paul Tillich’s Conception of God

Thursday, Feb. 8, 4:30 p.m. 

Markus Weidler, professor of philosophy at Columbus State University, explores the thought of existentialist philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich.

Tillich, regarded as one of the most influential theologians of the 20th century, was best known for his examinations of faith, Christian revelation, and human experience through modern culture. Weidler will show that there is a tension in Tillich’s thinking about God and explore several ways to overcome this tension.

A native of Berlin, Weidler earned his M.A. and his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin. He taught in New Zealand for two years before joining the faculty of Columbus State University in 2007. His special interests include the dynamics and manifestations of extremist thought associated with the notions of fundamentalism, fanaticism and terrorism.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public
(no ticket required)

Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies

Intercultural Perspectives on Gender and Sexuality: A Reading and Discussion with Antje Ravic-Sturbel and Joachim Helfer

Monday, Feb. 19, 5 p.m.

German writers Antje Ravic-Strubel and Joachim Helfer read from their works, which explore the topics of sex, gender and nationality. Ravic-Strubel is a prize-winning author who grew up in East Germany and has translated many of Joan Didion’s novels into German. Helfer, who grew up in West Germany, will read from his book What Makes a Man: Sex Talk in Beirut and Berlin, an extended dialogue with Lebanese author Rashid Al-Daif.

Following the readings, Gary Schmidt, professor of German and chair of CCU’s Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies, moderates a discussion concerning gender and nationality in both German and American cultures. This event has been made possible through the support of CCU’s Arts and Humanities Global Experience Program, the Center for Global Engagement, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Multicultural Student Services.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public
(no ticket required)

Department of English

WORDS TO SAY IT VISITING WRITERS SERIES

A Reading by Poet Jenny Gropp

Tuesday, Feb. 20, 5:30 p.m.

Poet and editor Jenny Gropp gives a reading of her work followed by a signing. Gropp is author of The Hominine Egg (Kore Press, 2017), and her poetry and prose appear in or are forthcoming from Fence, Denver Quarterly, Best New Poets, Seattle Review, Colorado Review, Seneca Review, Typo and DIAGRAM, among others. The former editor of Black Warrior Review, Gropp is now managing editor of the Georgia Review and a freelance editor for W.W. Norton & Co.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public 
(no ticket required)

‌Department of Politics

POLITICS AND ECONOMICS LECTURE SERIES

Roundtable on Adam Smith and the 21st Century

Monday, Feb. 26, 7:00 p.m.

Michelle Schwarze, Jack Miller Center Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison; Brandon Turner, associate professor of political science at Clemson University; and Rodolpho Hernandez, lecturer of political science at Texas State University, hold a roundtable discussion of Adam Smith’s economic theory and its relation to democratic citizens in the 21st century.

The Politics and Economics Lecture Series is sponsored by the Charles Koch Foundation, which supports education and research that facilitates dialogue and sparks innovation, creating opportunities for people to thrive.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public 
(no ticket required)