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‌Edwards College Film Series:

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

RELIGIOUS STUDIES MOVIE NIGHT

The Wailing‌

Tuesday, Jan. 16, 5 p.m.

In this 2016 South Korean horror film directed by Hong-jin Na, the arrival of a mysterious stranger in a quiet rural village causes suspicion among the villagers. As they begin killing each other for no apparent reason, however, that suspicion turns to panic. When the daughter of the investigating officer falls under the same savage spell, he calls in a shaman to assist in finding the culprit.

Following the screening, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies faculty members Ron Green, associate professor, and Alan Todd, lecturer, discuss the film’s philosophical themes and implications. This film is shown in Korean with English subtitles.

This film is not rated and may contain content that is inappropriate for children. Parental discretion is advised.

The Coastal Theater
Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public (no ticket required)

Edwards College Film Series:
Department of Communication, Media and Culture

COMMUNICATION MOVIE NIGHT

Arrival

Tuesday, Jan. 23, 6 p.m.

In Denis Villeneuve’s 2016 Academy Award-winning film, linguistics professor Louise Banks (Amy Adams) leads an elite team of investigators in exploring 12 mysterious spaceships that have touched down in locations around the world. As nations teeter on the verge of global war, Banks and her crew must find a way to communicate with the extraterrestrial visitors.

Following the screening, faculty members Cassandra Hill, Andrea Bergstrom and Deborah Breede from the Department of Communication, Media and Culture, will discuss the nuances and nature of communication in the film.

The Coastal Theater
Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public (no ticket required)

Edwards College Film Series: Department of History

WAR & SOCIETY FILM SERIES

Munich

Tuesday, Jan. 30, 5 p.m.

The world was watching in 1972 as 11 Israeli athletes were murdered at the Munich Olympics; Munich is the story of what happened next. Nominated for five Academy Awards, Steven Spielberg’s 2005 film is a Canadian-American historical drama/political thriller based on the Israeli government’s secret retaliation against members of the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) group Black September after the kidnapping and murder of the Olympic athletes. The film follows a squad of assassins, dubbed Operation Wrath of God, as they track down and kill the alleged perpetrators.

Following the film, Christopher Gunn, CCU assistant professor of history, provides historical and cultural context for the film regarding Arab-Israeli conflict and leads a discussion of the role of memory in historical understanding and comprehension of conflict.

This film is rated R and contains content that may be inappropriate for children. Parental discretion is advised.

The Coastal Theater
Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public (no ticket required)