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March | Lectures

Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Board of Visitors Lecture Series

REAL OR FAKE: NEWS AND WRITING IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES

WHAT IS NEWS?
HOW TO TELL FAKE NEWS FROM REAL JOURNALISM
IN AN ERA OF EXCESS INFORMATION

Saturday, March 3, 10 a.m.

Wendy Weinhold, CCU assistant professor in the Department of Communication, Media and Culture, helps us understand the advent of fake news by focusing her lecture on journalistic ethics and the law.

Weinhold holds a Ph.D. from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and a B.A. from Hastings College in Hastings, Neb. Weinhold’s work focuses on the changing definition of U.S. journalists in the digital age. Her articles have been published in Journalism Studies and Kaleidoscope and her research recognized with a Top Paper award from the International Communication Association.


Myrtle Beach Education Center, 79th Avenue North
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies 

HOLOCAUST REMEMBERED:
AN EXHIBIT OF THE COLUMBIA HOLOCAUST EDUCATION CENTER

Tuesday, March 6 – Thursday, March 22

“Holocaust Remembered” is a unique mobile Holocaust exhibit from the Columbia Holocaust Education Center that shares the personal stories of survivors and liberators from South Carolina. This exhibit was created to honor memories of the survivors and victims of the Holocaust and to teach others through those memories. In conjunction with the exhibit, local resident and Holocaust survivor Hugo Schiller gives a lecture on March 12 titled “A Voice from the Holocaust.”

The exhibit is open during Kimbel Library hours of operation;
visit www.coastal.edu/library for library hours.

Kimbel Library, first floor
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies

A VOICE FROM THE HOLOCAUST

Monday, March 12, 5 p.m.

Local resident and Holocaust survivor Hugo Schiller presents a lecture on his memories and experiences. At 9 years old, Schiller was deported from Grunsfeld, Germany, to Gurs, a concentration camp in France. His parents were transported to and executed at Auschwitz, and Schiller moved to a children’s home. In 1942, Schiller was smuggled out of France and sent to the U.S. He has been a resident of Myrtle Beach since 1967 and, along with his wife, Ellie, realized his dream of having an area Holocaust memorial built in 2016.

This lecture is presented in conjunction with “Holocaust Remembered: An Exhibit of the Columbia Holocaust Education Center,” on display March 6-22 on the first floor of CCU’s Kimbel Library.

The Coastal Theater
Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public

Multicultural Student Services

CHANTS CHAT

THIS IS A MAN’S WORLD?

Tuesday, March 13, 6 p.m.

Chants Chat is a discussion series during which CCU students, faculty, staff and community members engage in open dialogue on various topics related to social justice, inclusion and diversity. This discussion focuses on sexism and the recent #metoo movement. Franklin Ellis, assistant director of CCU Multicultural Student Services, moderates the discussion.

Wall Boardroom, Room 222
Admission: Free and open to the public

Women’s and Gender Studies

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH
KEYNOTE ADDRESS AND RECEPTION

Wednesday, March 14, 4:30 p.m.

Hilary M. Lips, professor emerita at Radford University, delivers the 2018 Women’s History Month keynote address, discussing the connections between gender and pay inequity. Lips earned a Ph.D. from Northwestern University in  Evanston, Ill., where her studies of women and gender led to the development and completion of her book in collaboration with Nina Colwill, The Psychology of Sex Differences (1978). A reception follows the presentation. 

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public 


Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values

PHILOSOPHER’S CORNER

WHY READ FICTION? A PHILOSOPHICAL DEFENSE

Thursday, March 15, 4:30 p.m.

Sarah E. Worth, professor of philosophy at Furman University and author of In Defense of Reading, explores why reading fiction is an important element in a happy and flourishing life. Worth argues that reading fiction provides us with the opportunity to acquire a wide range of important skills that help us make sense of life as a whole.

Worth earned an undergraduate degree in music and philosophy at Furman University, a master’s degree in philosophy at the University of Louisville and a Ph.D. in philosophy at the State University of New York at Buffalo. She taught at Allegheny College and Miami University before returning to Furman in 1999.

Wall Boardroom, Room 222
Admission: Free and open to the public

Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Board of Visitors Lecture Series

REAL OR FAKE: NEWS AND WRITING IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES

COMBATING FAKE NEWS: A MEDIA LITERACY APPROACH

Saturday, March 17, 10 a.m.

Andrea Bergstrom, CCU assistant professor in the Department of Communication, Media and Culture, delivers a lecture on ways to address and combat fake news through media literacy education.

Bergstrom earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in communication at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She was awarded the Palleschi-Hart Teaching Fellowship for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and was a Distinguished Teacher Award University Finalist while at UMass. She is co-author of the book The O.C.: A Critical Understanding (2014) as well as multiple journal articles. Bergstrom has presented her work on media literacy, media effects and representations within popular culture at regional, national and international conferences.

Myrtle Beach Education Center, 79th Avenue North
Admission: Free and open to the public

Women’s and Gender Studies

WHAT HOLDS WOMEN BACK? A PANEL ON FAMILY LEAVE POLICIES

Thursday, March 22, 4:30 p.m.

CCU faculty and area employers hold a panel discussion presenting various perspectives on the importance of supportive family leave policies. The discussion will also explore leave policies in other countries. The event is part of CCU’s Women’s History Month celebration; a reception follows the discussion.

The Coastal Theater
Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of Politics

THE REVOLUTIONARY ORIGINS OF AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONALISM

Thursday, March 22, 5 p.m.

C. Bradley Thompson, BB&T Research Professor in the Department of Political Science at Clemson University and executive director of the Clemson Institute for the Study of Capitalism, will deliver a lecture on the conceptual factors that led to the creation of the American Constitution.

John Adams once said that the American Revolution began in the minds and hearts of the American people fifteen years before shots were fired at Concord and Lexington.  What could Adams have meant by this extraordinary statement? Thompson’s talk will explore how American Revolutionaries discovered and developed the idea of a written constitution as fundamental law during the years of the Imperial Crisis. Thompson will explain how and why American patriots constitutionalized the moral rights of nature.

Thompson earned his Ph.D. at Brown University and has been a visiting scholar at Princeton University, Harvard University and the University of London. Thompson has also published essays on a range of topics including children’s rights, natural law theory, Marxism, Progressive education, and free-market education. He is completing a book titled The Ideological Origins of American Constitutionalism.

This event is sponsored by the CCU Department of Politics’ Forum on Liberty and the American Founding and the Institute for Humane Studies.

Edwards Recital Hall
Admission: Free and open to the public

 

Department of Anthropology and Geography

CULTURAL HERITAGE VISITING SCHOLARS SERIES

CULTIVATING COMMUNITY:
THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF JAPANESE-AMERICAN CONFINEMENT AT AMACHE

Thursday, March 22, 5:15 p.m.

Bonnie Clark, anthropologist, curator and associate professor of anthropology at the University of Denver, discusses her research project at Amache, the site of Colorado’s WWII-era Japanese-American internment camp. The forced removal and subsequent internment of more than 120,000 people of Japanese descent from their homes along the West Coast of the U.S. during World War II is a pivotal incident in world history.

Since 2008, Clark has led archaeological investigations at the site of Amache. Clark discusses the project, highlighting insights about the camp’s landscape and the strategies of a confined people to reknit community and reclaim humanity.

Brittain Hall, Room 114
Admission: Free and open to the public

 


Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Board of Visitors Lecture Series

REAL OR FAKE: NEWS AND WRITING IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES

MEMOIR WRITING IN THE ERA OF OVER-SHARING

Saturday, March 24, 10 a.m.

Joe Oestreich, professor and chair of CCU’s Department of English, lectures on the difference between the memoir and the social media status update, offering strategies for those interested in writing about their own lives.

Oestreich holds an M.F.A. in creative writing from Ohio State University and is the author of four books of creative nonfiction: Waiting to Derail (co-written with Thomas O’Keefe, forthcoming in 2018), Partisans (Black Lawrence Press, 2017), Lines of Scrimmage (co-written with Scott Pleasant, 2015) and Hitless Wonder (2012). His essays have appeared in Esquire, Sports Illustrated, Creative Nonfiction, River Teeth, Ninth Letter, Fourth Genre, The Normal School and other magazines and journals.

Myrtle Beach Education Center, 79th Avenue North
Admission: Free and open to the public

Thomas W. and Robin W. Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Board of Visitors Lecture Series

REAL OR FAKE: NEWS AND WRITING IN CONTEMPORARY TIMES

DIGITAL POLARIZATION PROJECT

Saturday, March 31, 10 a.m.

Jen Boyle, CCU professor in the Department of English, discusses the Digital Polarization Project, a current student study about the ways algorithms work to normalize fake news and social media feeds.

Boyle, who holds a Ph.D. in English and an M.A. in comparative literature from the University of California at Irvine, teaches and writes about questions of media transformation and theories of mediation. Her scholarship and teaching explore “new” media objects and performance; bodies and technology; and the virtual and material flows of objects and information through networks from the 17th century to the digital present.

Myrtle Beach Education Center, 79th Avenue North
Admission: Free and open to the public