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October Lectures

 

Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values
PHILOSPHER’S CORNER

TRUE GENEROSITY MEANS MORE
THAN JUST GIVING

Thursday, Oct. 3, 4:30 p.m.

Christian Miller, visiting scholar and A.C. Reid Professor of Philosophy at Wake Forest University, delivers a lecture on our understanding of generosity and how it has evolved since the deliberation of virtue and character in the 21st century. Miller says that generosity is an overlooked characteristic in academic research, especially in philosophy.

Brittain Hall, Room 101
Admission: Free and open to the public

Office of Academic and Community Outreach
OLLI LECTURE SERIES: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

THE ECONOMICS OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Saturday, Oct. 5, 10 a.m.

Robert Salvino, professor in CCU’s Department of Finance and Economics and director of the Grant Center for Real Estate and Economic Development, delivers a lecture on the history of moral development in industrialized societies. He considers how societies determine the choices and concerns that belong to the public sphere versus the private sphere.

Burroughs & Chapin Center, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of History
WAR & SOCIETY COLLOQUIA

“INDIAN WARS” IN EARLY AMERICA

Friday, Oct. 11, 1:30 p.m.

John Navin, professor in CCU’s Department of History, presents a lecture on a series of conflicts between 1607 and 1763 involving Native Americans and British colonists known as the “Indian Wars.” Navin’s exploration of these conflicts in Virginia, the Carolinas and New England reveals the sources of interracial tensions, the events that sparked the wars, the tactics and military strategies that each group employed and the consequences of war for specific tribes and colonies.

Burroughs & Chapin Center, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

 

Department of Languages and Intercultural Studies

UNDERSTANDING CHINA’S CONTEMPORARY “SILK ROAD”: THE BELT AND ROAD INITIATIVE

Wednesday, Oct. 16, 4:30 p.m.

Wanqing Dang, exchange scholar from Xi’an University of Science and Technology, presents a lecture on the development and impact of the Belt and Road Initiative, a crucial development strategy in today’s China. The project aims to build trade and infrastructure networks involving 152 countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa and Latin America.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

 Department of Anthropology and Geography

DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY: AN UPDATE

Thursday, Oct. 17, 5:15 p.m.

The discipline of archaeology is evolving by embracing digital technology through digital imaging and mobile capabilities. Michael Ashley, director of technology at the Center for Digital Archaeology (CoDA) and president of Codifi Inc., presents a lecture on how recent breakthroughs are transforming the ways the field is practiced, experienced and understood.

Edwards, Room 246
Admission: Free and open to the public

Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies

THE BLACK SHEEP OF THE BLACK SHEEP

Thursday, Oct. 17, 6 p.m.

Issac Bailey, Harvard Nieman Fellow and James K. Batten Professor of Journalism at Davidson College, presents a lecture on the interrelationship of race and the criminal justice system. Author of the critically acclaimed book My Brother Moochie: Regaining Dignity in the Face of Crime, Poverty and Racism in the American South (2018), Bailey shares personal insights into the devastating effects of the prison system on the incarcerated, their loved ones and society as a whole.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public; ticket required for entry

Intercultural and Inclusion Student Services

“POURING TEA”: BLACK GAY MEN OF THE SOUTH TELL THEIR TALES

Thursday, Oct. 17, 6 p.m.

E. Patrick Johnson performs “Pouring Tea,” a one-person dramatic reading of religion, sex, coming of age and coming out, sponsored by Intercultural and Inclusion Student Services at CCU in celebration of LGBTQIA+ culture. The performance is based on the collected material in Johnson’s book, Black Gay Men of the South – An Oral History (2008), recognized as a Stonewall Book Award Honor Book by the LGBT Round Table of the American Library Association.

The Coastal Theater Lib Jackson Student Union, A-110
Admission: Free and open to the public

 Office of Academic and Community Outreach
OLLI LECTURE SERIES: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

SUPERABUNDANCE, MORAL HAZARD AND SELF-INTEREST RIGHTLY UNDERSTOOD

Saturday, Oct. 19, 10 a.m.

Kimberly Hale, assistant professor in CCU’s Department of Politics, presents a lecture on the ways in which American capitalism has evolved in tandem with socialist ideas first embraced by the politics of the Progressive era of the 1890s to 1920s. She uses Marx’s critique of modernity to discuss and analyze modern society’s tendency to blur the lines between the public and private sectors and work environments.

Burroughs & Chapin Center, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of English
WORDS TO SAY IT VISITING WRITERS SERIES

A FICTION READING: JAMES BRUBAKER

Wednesday, Oct. 23, 5:30 p.m.

James Brubaker presents a reading and book signing. Brubaker’s works range in subject matter from time travel to television to music journalism, full of humorous characters and strange, memorable moments. Brubaker is author of the novel The Taxidermist’s Catalog (2019) and short fiction collections Black Magic Death Sphere: (Science) Fictions (2018), Liner Notes (2014) and Pilot Season (2014). He is the director of Southeast Missouri State Press and an editor for the journal Big Muddy.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values
PHILOSOPHER’S CORNER

SILENCE AS LOVE: LITERATURE AND
CULTIVATING MORAL ATTENTION

Thursday, Oct. 24, 4:30 p.m.

Kristina Grob, visiting scholar and assistant professor of philosophy at the University of South Carolina at Sumter, delivers a lecture on the idea of loving others in silence. Grob hopes to illustrate a better way we can become aware of the difficulty of loving others by concentrating on how to quiet our criticisms and focus attention on listening to each other.

Brittain Hall, Room 101
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of History
WAR & SOCIETY COLLOQUIA

ARE WE READY FOR THE FUTURE

OF WARFARE?

Friday, Oct. 25, 1:30 p.m.

Joseph Fitsanakis, CCU associate professor in the Department of Politics, presents a lecture on the nature of warfare in the future. Experts agree that it will be urban and involve increasingly formidable non-state groups. Wars will take place in over-populated environments, where illicit networks motivated by financial gain or ethnic and religious grievances will directly challenge the chronic dysfunction of governments.

Burroughs & Chapin Center, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public