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October Lectures

How Machiavellian was Machiavelli? A Debate on Truth, Lies and the Meaning of The Prince

Tuesday, Oct. 2, 7 p.m.

The word “Machiavellian” has become synonymous with deceit and dishonesty in politics. However, scholars have always struggled to reconcile the cynical advice found in The Prince with the author’s life, most of which was spent opposing tyranny and supporting democratic republics. Brian Nance, professor in CCU’s Department of History, and several of his students will examine these notions through a debate of the classical text, questioning whether Machiavelli’s intent was ironic, if not satirical.

Edwards Recital Hall
Admission: Free and open to the public

Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values

Domestic and Intimate Partner Violence

Wednesday, Oct. 4, 6 p.m.

This panel discussion on domestic and intimate partner violence involves students, faculty and local community stakeholders. Faculty include Kaitlyn Sidorsky, assistant professor in the Department of Politics; Deborah Breede, professor in the Department of Communication, Media and Culture; and Ina Seethaler, assistant professor and director of Women’s and Gender Studies. Community organizations include the Family Justice Center of Horry and Georgetown counties and the Rape Crisis Center of Horry and Georgetown counties. The discussion will focus on current challenges in reducing such violence in the coastal and Horry-Georgetown communities and is aimed at increasing awareness and activism of this ongoing, local problem.

Lib Jackson Student Union, Room A-201
Admission: Free and open to the public

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
TERRORISM LECTURE SERIES

TERRORISM SINCE 1967

Saturday, Oct. 6; 9:30 a.m. refreshments; 10 a.m. session  

While the origins of modern terrorism can be traced back to the late 19th century, this lecture, presented by Christopher Gunn, assistant professor in the Department of History, will focus on the history of this political tactic since 1967. The results of the Six-Day War in the Middle East, and the more general radicalization of global publics in the wake of the political upheavals of 1968, led to an internationalization of terrorism that we are still dealing with today.

Burroughs & Chapin Building, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

Jackson Family Center for Ethics and Values
PHILOSOPHER’S CORNER 

Getting Closer to Virtue:
Secular and Christian Insights on Improving Our Character

Thursday, Oct. 11, 4:30 p.m.   

Christian Miller, visiting scholar and A.C. Reid Professor of Philosophy at Wake Forest University, will present core ideas from his latest book, The Character Gap: How Good Are We? His discussion will examine how we often fall short of the virtues and character-strengths to which we aspire. Following the lecture, Miller will outline a variety of strategies for character development and suggest practical steps that can lead toward making ourselves better people.

Wall Boardroom, Room 222
Admission: Free and open to the public

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
TERRORISM LECTURE SERIES

Media and Terrorism

Saturday, Oct. 13; 9:30 a.m. refreshments; 10 a.m. session

The media have been described as the “oxygen of terrorism.” In this lecture, Misti Williams, lecturer in the Department of Communication, Media and Culture, discusses the increasing media savvy of terrorists and how the free press plays a fundamental part in advancing the goals of terrorist organizations.

Burroughs & Chapin Building, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

Women in Philanthropy and Leadership

Leading Women in Local Government

Wednesday, Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m. 

Women lead three major cities in Horry County, and these local politicians come together to discuss women in government roles. Brenda Bethune, mayor of Myrtle Beach; Marilyn Hatley, mayor of North Myrtle Beach; and Barbara Blain-Bellamy, mayor of Conway, will discuss their pathways to leadership and public service.

A Myrtle Beach native, Bethune is CEO and majority owner of Better Brands, Inc. She has served on the Board of CCU’s Spadoni College of Education and on the Board of Visitors at the Wall School of Business.

Blain-Bellamy, a native of Conway, served on Conway city council from 1993-1998 and 2012-2016 and served as mayor pro tem in 1996 and 2015 before becoming sworn in as mayor of Conway on January 4, 2016.

Mayor of North Myrtle Beach since 2001, Marilyn Hatley is owner, president and manager of Visible Designs, Inc., hair salon and is a founder and director of Coastal Carolina National Bank.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
TERRORISM LECTURE SERIES

The Future of Terrorism and Armed Militancy

Saturday, Oct. 20; 9:30 a.m. refreshments; 10 a.m. session

Future trends in terrorism are currently being shaped by the ongoing wars in Iraq, Syria, Libya, Yemen and elsewhere, as well as by globalization and the emergence of cyber actors. In this lecture, Joseph Fitsanakis, associate professor in the Department of Politics, will explore these trends and outline the shape of things to come in the area of terrorism and armed militancy.

Burroughs & Chapin Building, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of English and Women in Philanthropy and Leadership
WORDS TO SAY IT VISITING WRITERS SERIES

A Fiction Reading by Holly Goddard Jones

Thursday, Oct 25. 5:30 p.m.

Fiction writer Holly Goddard Jones presents a reading of her work followed by a signing. Jones is the author of The Salt Line, The Next Time You See Me and Girl Trouble: Stories. Her work has appeared in The Best American Mystery Stories, New Stories from the South, Tin House and elsewhere. She was the 2013 recipient of the Fellowship of Southern Writers’ Hillsdale Prize for Excellence in Fiction and a 2017 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award.

Jones earned her MFA from Ohio State University and her BA from the University of Kentucky. She teaches creative writing at University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Intercultural and Inclusion Student Services
CHANTS CHAT

The Struggle is Real

Thursday, Oct. 25, 6:30 p.m.

Join students, staff, faculty and community members in an open dialogue about various topics centered on social justice, inclusion and diversity moderated by Franklin Ellis, CCU assistant director of Intercultural and Inclusion Student Services. This discussion will focus on the informal tax that minorities pay in the form of additional duties, expectations and challenges when working in a white-dominated institution. It will offer personal thoughts and accounts on the topic from various members of the CCU body. 

Wall Boardroom, Room 222
Admission: Free and open to the public