In This Section

September Lectures

Institute for Humane Studies, Department of Politics, and Edgar Dyer Institute for Leadership and Public Policy

Constitution Day Lecture

“Lincoln and the Rule of Law”

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 5 p.m.

Abraham Lincoln’s unwavering opposition to the Supreme Court’s 1857 decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford left him open to the accusation that he was undermining the rule of law – or worse. In his famous subsequent debates with Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas, and in the concrete crises he faced during the Civil War, Lincoln defended himself against the charge of inviting lawlessness, and developed a nuanced view of the Constitution’s separation of powers and the conditions necessary to maintain the rule of law in a time of crisis. 

Justin B. Dyer is professor of political science at the University of Missouri, and founding director of the Kinder Institute on Constitutional Democracy. He is author, coauthor, or editor of six books, and his articles have been published in both academic and popular outlets.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Intercultural and Inclusion Student Services

CULTURAL CELEBRATON

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 11:30 a.m.

This annual cultural festival highlights the music, history, dance, art and food of many countries across the globe. The entire CCU community celebrates the myriad cultures that form our world.

Spadoni Park
Admission: Free and open to the public

Charles Joyner Institute for Gullah and African Diaspora Studies

THE LIFE AND LEGACY OF HARRIET TUBMAN, AN AMERICAN HERO. WHY ALL THE ATTENTION NOW?

Friday, Sept. 20 at 4 p.m.

Harriet Tubman is an extraordinary historical figure. Famous during her lifetime and memorialized and commemorated periodically since her death in 1913, Tubman’s importance has grown dramatically in the past twenty years. Why? Come hear about Tubman the woman and icon and join in a discussion of the remarkable tenacity of her legacy." 

 Kate Clifford Larson, PhD, is an author, historian and consultant. Dr. Larson is a leading Harriet Tubman scholar and the author of the critically acclaimed biography, Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero (2004). She has worked as a consultant and interpretive specialist for numerous public history initiatives related to Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad in Maryland, She has consulted on film scripts, documentaries, museum exhibits, and numerous publications. Larson is also the author of The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln (2008), and Rosemary: The Hidden Kennedy Daughter (2015). She is currently writing a biography of Civil Rights icon, Fannie Lou Hamer entitled Walk With Me, due out from Oxford University Press in 2021.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Office of the Provost

DISTINGUISHED SCHOLAR LECTURE SERIES: DERRECK KAYONGO

Tuesday, Sept. 24, 3:30 p.m.

The Office of the Provost presents a lecture by Derreck Kayongo, visiting lecturer and former CEO of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, as an honorary distinguished CCU scholar. Kayongo was a Ugandan refugee who became an entrepreneur and has had a global impact as a humanitarian. Kayongo is the founder of the Global Soap Project, a group that recycles used hotel soap and redistributes it to impoverished nations across the world. Kayongo is also a member of the board of trustees for Helen Keller International, an organization committed to improving the lives of those with sight impairments.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public

Department of Anthropology and Geography

Restoring Forests and the Human Spirit

Wednesday, Sept. 25, 4:30 p.m.

A lecture by Jeffrey Karwoski, arborist, environmental activist, and avid lover of trees. His world travels have led him to the Philippines where he manages a reforestation project aimed at post-disaster recovery from 2013’s super typhoon Yolanda. After cleaning up the aftermath on the hardest hit island of Leyte, he started and continues to manage the Leyte Reforestation Project, an effort to restore the devastated landscape of the island. The project is about more than just planting trees – it is about rediscovering the bond we have with trees and our place in the natural world. In an age of environmental uncertainty, a new way of thinking and acting is required to restore both forests and the human spirit.

Brittain Hall, Room 112
Admission: Free and open to the public (no ticket required)

Department of English

WORDS TO SAY IT VISITING WRITERS SERIES

A FICTION READING: WENDY RAWLINGS

Thursday, Sept. 26, 5:30 p.m.

Novelist, essayist and critic Wendy Rawlings presents a reading from her work, followed by a signing. Rawlings is author of the short story collections Come Back Irish (2001) and Time for Bed and the novel The Agnostics (2007), which won the Michigan Literary Fiction Award. She directs the M.F.A. program at the University of Alabama.

Johnson Auditorium, Wall 116
Admission: Free and open to the public (no ticket required)

Department of History

WAR & SOCIETY COLLOQUIA

SAME SONG, DIFFERENT STATE: THE CHANGING ROLE OF MUSICAL FOLKLOREIN AZERBAIJAN AFTER THE FALL OF THE U.S.S.R.

Friday, Sept. 27, 1:30 p.m.

A panel of CCU students, staff and faculty will discuss the harmful consequences of food insecurity among college students, with a particular focus on how this problem relates to broader issues of socioeconomic status and how going hungry can negatively affect their participation in both academic and social life on campus. In this second event of the Empty Belly Ethics series, the panel will explain the need for and importance of the student pantry and will invite the audience to participate in creating innovative ways to combat the challenge of student hunger.

Burroughs & Chapin Center, Room 100
Admission: Free and open to the public