List of Courses Focus for DEI - Coastal Carolina University
In This Section

EDWARDS COLLEGE COURSES WITH A SIGNIFICANT FOCUS IN DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 100: Intro to Anthropology Credits: 3

Anthropology is the study of humankind, past and present. This course will provide a general introduction to the subfields of cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, and archaeology. By using ethnographies, human biology, and archaeological artifacts, students will investigate a variety of case studies and perspectives to better understand the wide range of human experience on a global scale.

ANTH 101/L: Primates, People, and Prehistory Credits: 3

An exploration of human origins, human evolution, human prehistory and cultural existence from its less complex forms to early civilizations. An introduction to the concepts, methods and data of physical, biological and archaeological anthropology.

ANTH 102: Understanding Other Cultures Credits: 3

An exploration and comparison of selected contemporary cultures, including their languages. An introduction to the concepts, methods and data of sociocultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics.

ANTH 120: Cultures and Environments Credits: 3

(=GEOG 120) This course will introduce students to intersections between people and the world around them. We will explore the ways in which the environment shapes human cultures, how cultures adapt and change the environment, and the feedback loops that are created in an anthropogenic landscape. We will use case studies to illustrate these theories and discuss how our perspectives inform our understanding and interpretation of environments and human cultures, both past and present.

ANTH 300: Human Landscapes Credits: 3

(=GEOG 300)(Prereq: ANTH*120 or GEOG*120) This course intensively examines the way in which anthropologists and geographers use landscape analysis in studies of the interaction between people and their environment. We will discuss the formation of anthropogenic landscapes and feedback cycles, and the way in which this affects human behaviors past and present. Case studies can include agriculture, climate change, pollution, population, urbanization, and the Anthropocene.

ANTH 314: Survey of African American Musics Credits: 3

Music has been a crucial facet of the daily experiences of African Americans even before the advent of the Atlantic Slave Trade. Whether they were playing games, working on plantations, marching for civil rights, or engaging in religious worship, African Americans created and utlized music to facilitate the successful creation and propagation of diverse styles (genres) of African American musics. Formal training in music is not required for this course.

ANTH 346: Historical Archaeology Credits: 3

Historical archaeology is the archaeological study of colonial expansion and subsequent post-Columbian peoples, or, more broadly defined, it is the archaeological study of people for whom textual evidence was available. This course introduces students to

historical archaeology through a sample of research from around the world (but with an emphasis on sites in the New World). Students are also exposed to the major theoretical orientations and methods of historical archaeology.

ANTH 427: African Prehistory Credits: 3

This course provides an introduction to the prehistory of African spanning the earlier emergence of humans until the period of the early European contact. Among other topics, we will explore the rise and fall of some of the great African civilizations using an examination of material artifacts. This course takes a chronological approach, beginning with the archaeological evidence of our hominin ancestors, and will examine a range of case studies and archaeological examples. Topics covered may include subsistence and settlement, technology, exchange, social complexity, and culture contact.

COMMUNICATION

COMM 140 Modern Human Communication Credits: 3

Communication is the study of human interaction. This course provides students with an overview of the practical applications and theoretical approaches to the study of communication through an exploration of four key areas: interpersonal, intercultural, group, and public communication

COMM 150 Media, Self, and the World Credits: 3

(=COMM 150H)Examines the many ways media systems and mediated communication shape our understanding of ourselves and our world. How various media (e.g., television, internet, newspapers) interact and deliver content (e.g., entertainment, news, advertising) that influence the "real world" are examined. Also looks at how new technologies allow easier direct access to content. Special attention is given to how students can apply media literacy skills to their academic and personal lives.

COMM 206 Introduction to Sports Communication Credits: 3

This course examines how we communicate about sport, how sport is communicated to us,and what is communicated by sports- each represents critical opportunities to evaluate,critique, and improve our public culture. This course provides a survey of the many approaches in communication studies of sport, focusing on different communicative contexts including interpersonal, mediated, organizational, and public communication.

COMM 275 Communication Theory Credits: 3

(Prereq: COMM 140) Provides an in-depth survey of theories and relevant criticism in communication and prepares students for theoretical application in research and thesis preparation.

COMM 301 Intercultural Communication Credits: 3

=(LIS 301)Focuses on the dynamics of how culture influences the communication process. Considers topics such as the roles of rituals and social dramas and provides an extensive and relevant discussion of different worldviews to gain "cultural competency".

COMM 304 Gender Communication Credits: 3

Gender Communication inquires into the connections among four areas of study: gender, identity, culture, and communication. Students explore the multiple ways that gender roles are created and sustained through communication in such contexts as families, schools, the workplace, and the media.

COMM 306 Sports Media Credits: 3

(Prereq:COMM 206) Traditional assignments and graded material featuring critical application of course information are joined to practical field assignments to prepare students for the near-term career market. Topics may include the relationships between sports media and sports media professionals,collegiate and professional sports industries, athletes,audiences,and social media, including their history,impact,and ethical implications.Class time may feature guest lectures from across the sports industry.

COMM 340 Media Effects Credits: 3

This course examines the use and effects of media for individuals and societies. It will cover topics such as: what media content affects people, the types of people who are affected by media content, what those effects are and how they occur, and what situations make effects more or less likely to occur

COMM 345 Communication Activism Credits: 3

(Prereq: Juniors and Seniors only and successful completion of 60 credit hours) This seminar requires students to work with non-governmental, governmental, and/or grass roots advocacy groups engaging in public service, social justice, and/or other applied communication projects often now collectively referred to as Communication Activism. Utilizing a variety of communication skills- including but not limited to message design for foundational, educational, and/or preventive campaigns - students will research, publicize, advocate against, and/or intervene in a social justice project with a community service organization. This is an active, intensive course that combines service learning with perspectives and practices from communication, health promotion, social science, and journalism. As such, this course is designed for students committed to social activism

COMM 350 Interpersonal Communication Foundations Credits: 3

(Prereq: COMM 140) This course will cover the basic principles of interpersonal communication which includes - but is not limited to - communicating with friends, co-workers, fellow students, and various general publics. Discussions will cover general communication theories and topics such as communication and self-concept, perceptions, language and culture, nonverbal communication, conflict management, and listening. Students will work on deepening their understanding of communication and on improving their communication skills.

COMM 380 Signs Among Us: The Semiotics of Culture Credits: 3

(=IDS 380) A study of the signs and sign systems produced, exchanged and interpreted in contemporary culture. From toys to cuisine, from comics to video games, from plastic to astrology, the course offers critical approaches to the mutliple spheres of meaning in which we move.

COMM 431 Effects and Representation from Popular Films Credits: 3

Explores the communication of idenity and representation in popular movies, from audience rather than creater perspectives. Focuses on the social, political, economics, and historical contexts in which such film representations emerged and evolved, as well as misrepresentation, exploitation, and appropriation of identities in messages experienced by mainstream audiences. Film techniques are explored from audience, film criticism, and communication perspectives, as are audience uses and effects of the films.

COMM 500 Foundations of the Communication Discipline. Credits: 3

Focuses on developing an understanding of the communication discipline, including the field's intellectual history, and establishes the foundation for graduate inquiry within the discipline.

COMM 501 Communication Leadership Credits: 3

(Prereq: Graduate Standing) Prepares students to assume leadership roles in various contexts and organizations, through the study of effective communication strategies for leadership, structure, and culture.

COMM 530 Communication to Targeted Audiences Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of current issues relevant to particular groups in their relation to communication tactics, theories, relationships, etc. Topics may include issues relating to effecting communication with members of various ethnicities, races, genders, and other groups.

COMM 599 Communication Assistant Pedagogy Credits: 3

(Prereq: Graduate Standing) Training in teaching University Core of as-needed courses offered by the Department of Communication, Media, and Culture. Topics include preparing course plans and materials and responding to student needs. Required each semester for all Graduate Teaching Assistants

ENGLISH

ENGL 101*87: Composition Credits: 4

This is an inclusive course that promotes and values diversity, which will be reflected in the readings, teaching, and class environment.

ENGL 101*68: Composition Credits: 4

This is an inclusive course that promotes and values diversity, which will be reflected in the readings, teaching, and class environment.

ENGL 101*35: Composition Credits: 4

This is an inclusive course that promotes and values diversity, which will be reflected in the readings, teaching, and class environment.

ENGL 201*01: Intro to Creative Writing Credits: 3

A diverse ecosystem of readings and wide and rewilding selection of heterogeneous approaches to writing technique and process are sampled. Class culture centers inclusive discussion and feedback that considers audience and thinks through craft

inheritances and when and where individual works might choose to subscribe to them, stretch them, or reinvent them entirely.

ENGL 201*06: Intro to Creative Writing Credits: 3

A diverse ecosystem of readings and wide and rewilding selection of heterogeneous approaches to writing technique and process are sampled. Class culture centers inclusive discussion and feedback that considers audience and thinks through craft inheritances and when and where individual works might choose to subscribe to them, stretch them, or reinvent them entirely.

ENGL 201*05: Intro to Creative Writing Credits: 3

This is an inclusive course that promotes and values diversity, which will be reflected in the readings, teaching, and class environment.

ENGL 205*02: L&C: Black in Literary U.S.A. Credits: 3

This class will focus on expanded representations and understandings of African-American literature in fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and film. We will examine how expressions from white and African American writers have shaped and defined African-American literature.

ENGL 205*03: L&C: On the Job Credits: 3

Students explore American representations of work, ranging from essay to poetry, video to short and long fiction. In these literary, audio, and visual texts, a diverse array (racial, ethnic, religious, and gender) of American authors and composers describe, discuss, and dwell on the individual’s place within a powerful and impersonal economic system.

ENGL 205*05 L&C: Immigrants and Exiles Credits: 3

In this course we’ll read and view accounts of migration in contemporary fiction, film, poetry, television series, essays, and graphic memoir centered on characters from Mexico, Ireland, Vietnam, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Italy, Afghanistan, Somalia, and elsewhere. Our discussions will explore themes including national and cultural identity, boundaries and belonging, language and translation, and the powers and failures of memory.

ENGL 277*01: Literature Across Cultures: Myth, Epic and Folklore Credits: 3

This course focuses on Asia and the Middle East while following the paths of Moroccan traveler Ibn Battuta and Italian traveler Marco Polo.

ENGL 300*01: Critical Conversations in English: Border Crossings Credits: 3

Whether seeking to flee war, escape natural disaster, evade political or religious persecution, or increase economic opportunities, those who cross borders often have fascinating stories to tell. With a mix of genres (feature film, documentary, novel, graphic novel, short story, poetry, and essays) from a range of places (Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and the US border with Mexico), this course explores stories of people on the move around a world that has become both increasingly mobile and increasingly nationalistic.

ENGL 301*E1: Forms of Creative Writing Credits: 3

A diverse ecosystem of readings and wide and rewilding selection of heterogeneous approaches to writing technique and process are sampled. Class culture centers

inclusive discussion and feedback that considers audience and thinks through craft inheritances and when and where individual works might choose to subscribe to them, stretch them, or reinvent them entirely.

ENGL 311*01: Topics in Shakespeare: Future Shakespeare Credits: 3

This course explores the dynamic cultures and practices of Shakespearean storytelling in the 21st century. We will analyze how “Shakespeare” plays—on the page, stage, and screens—adapt meaningfully over time and across diverse cultures, constantly opening up interpretive possibilities to remain relevant and provocative in our present and futures.

ENGL 332*01: Perspectives on American Literature and Culture Credits: 3

Students study American literature and culture from the perspective of antinomianism (dissent/disobedience/resistance). We focus on key points of this theme, with attention on overlap between and among authors and texts. The wide-range of ethnic, gender, racial, and religious perspectives reveals the fluid nature of culture, the intertextuality of it, the diversity and ceaseless borrowing and border-crossing that occur between and among authors, genres, historical periods, social movements, topics, and texts.

ENGL 334*02: Prsp Brit Lit/Cltr: No Dead White Men Credits: 3 This section of ENGL 334 breaks from the stereotypical study of dead white men’s literature, instead focusing on British fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and cinema from the late 18thC through today that was created by BIPOC persons or white women. The texts by these writers that get circulated tend to be less interested in the solitary genius and more invested in examining and ameliorating contemporary cruelties by fostering communal ties – emotionally, morally, polemically. We will read and respond to these historically under-represented writers’ takes on human rights, reform, abolition, gender, war, imperialism, post-colonialism, literature, education, childhood, technological developments, and more.

ENGL 335*01 Perspectives on World Lit Credits: 3

This course puts European legacy literature into conversation with literatures of Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and the Americas with an awareness of the legacies of cultural and economic imperialism.

ENGL 337*01 Perspectives on Genre: S. Asian Wom’s Diaspora Credits: 3

From Kamala Harris to Padma Lakshmi, the creative labor of South Asian women’s diaspora represents the nexus of assimilation and alienation that simultaneously questions Western logics of gendered belonging: within bodies, spaces, communities, and nations. Covering diverse popular media—food shows, fashion, journalism, films, fiction—this course will analyze works of South Asian women who adopt intersectional methods to examine identity and the interconnections of gender, religion, race, age, ethnicity, class, ability, nationality, sexuality, and location.

ENGL 341*01: African-American Literature, 1750-present Credits: 3

This course surveys the African-American literary tradition, covering the periods of slavery, post-Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and postmodernism. Using various genres in the canon, we will explore the past and the history of African American literary production in order to engage with present contexts of struggle.

ENGL 352*01 African American English Credits: 3

In this course we will explore African American English from historical, social, and educational perspectives. Throughout the course we weave together linguistic and social theory as well as educational policy to come to a nuanced understanding of the ways in which African American English has been studied by linguists and the ways that it has been regarded in public spaces. We will take a variationist approach, looking at the linguistic structure of African American English. We will also spend time discussing the major debates about the origins of African American English. We will then move to discussions of African American English in the social landscape of America and end with discussions of the history of African American English and educational policy.

ENGL 355*01: Introduction to Discourse Analysis Credits: 3

Introduction to Discourse Analysis takes a multi-cultural approach to the study of discourse. We will examine the interactional practices of different cultures and communities, how these practices are shaped by systems of oppression and marginalization, and how social inequities can be shaped, reproduced, and challenged through discourse.

ENGL 459* 01 Advanced Composition and Rhetoric Credits: 3

This section explores the structures of literacy learning within larger social economies, highlighting how linguistic diversity plays out in classroom spaces and beyond. As we move through current research within the field, we will focus on ways discourse communities function and utilize language, looking first to the genre of the literacy narrative as a site for exploration of theory, then branching out to begin building a larger final project on topics of your choice. Throughout, our conversations will stem from a central understanding of language as ideological and related to a sense of identity and self. The course covers a variety of topics relating to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, looking at the relationship between primary and secondary discourse, literacy learning, English as a global language, race and writing assessment, and research methodologies for studying underserviced communities in Composition and Rhetoric. Theoretical and pedagogical lenses including feminist studies and antiracist pedagogies guide readings and assignments.

ENGL *469*01: Special Topics in Creative Writing: Eco-justice Credits: 3

Eco-justice writing confronts the fact that environmental degradation, pollution, and climate change disproportionally affect disadvantaged communities. Students will read a diverse selection of poetry and nonfiction exploring the intersections between environmental and social equality, and they will write their own eco-justice poetry and eco-justice nonfiction.

GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 120: Cultures and Environments Credits: 3

(=ANTH 120) This course will introduce students to intersections between people and the world around them. We will explore the ways in which the environment shapes human cultures, how cultures adapt and change the environment, and the feedback loops that are created in an anthropogenic landscape. We will use case studies to

illustrate these theories and discuss how our perspectives inform our understanding and interpretation of environments and human cultures, both past and present.

GEOG 300: Human Landscapes Credits: 3

(=ANTH 300)(Prereq: ANTH 120/GEOG 120) This course intensively examines the way in which anthropologists and geographers use landscape analysis in studies of ther interaction between people and their environment. We will discuss the formation of anthropogenic landscapes and feedback cycles, and the way in which this affects human behaviors past and present. Case studies can include agriculture, climate change, pollution, population, urbanization, and the Anthropocene.

GEOG 121: World Regional Geography Credits: 3

An introduction to basic geographical concepts used by geographers in examining the fundamental contrasts between various countries of the world. Analysis of regions of the world, western and nonwestern with respect to physical, cultural (both majority and minority), political and economic orientation.

GEOG 351: Spiritual Landscapes Credits: 3

(=ANTH*351) In this course, students examine the intersections of geography and anthropology with spiritual beliefs and experiences associate with various landscapes and geologic formations around the world. We discuss the concepts of topophilia and the human-environmental connection through the geographies of religion and belief systems. Class case studies include mythology, historical accounts, cultural resource management reports, archaeology research, and impacts from tourism.

HISTORY

HIST 105 Pre-Modern World Credits: 3

This course explores historical interpretations of pre-modern human experiences. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.

HIST 106 Modern World Credits: 3

This course explores historical interpretations of modern human experiences. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.

HIST 200 Introduction to Southern Studies Credits: 3

This survey course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the idea of southern identity by specifically investigating the history of the geographical region. We may explore the South as a way of life, investigating the cultural practices and traditions that have given the region its distinctive identity. We will ask: "what is the South," "where is the South," and "who are Southerners" looking at how these identities and realities have evolved over time. This course introduces students to the craft and concepts involved in interdisciplinary knowledge production, and will serve as an introductory course to the Southern Studies minor. Students will be exposed to materials used in a multitude of disciplines and will be asked to evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art

HIST 201 History of the United States from Discovery to the Present: Discovery through Reconstruction Credits: 3

A general survey of the United States from the era of dis covery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. 201: Discovery through Reconstruction. 202: Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 202 History of the United States from Discovery to the Present: Reconstruction to the Present Credits: 3

A general survey of the United States from the era of dis covery to the present, emphasizing major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments. 201: Discovery through Reconstruction. 202: Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 205 U.S. History Credits: 3

This course explores the historical development of connections between individuals, societies and cultures in the Americas. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics

HIST 250-DL Historical Research & Writing, Theme: African Diaspora Credits: 3

A course designed to teach both written and oral communication in history. Topics include compiling a scholarly bibliography on a historical topic interpreting primary and secondary sources, developing a clear thesis, ensuring academic integrity, using Chicago-style documentation, and presenting work in a scholarly fashion. A minimum of twelve pages of graded, written work, with substantial opportunities for revision, and at least one graded oral presentation required. Topics chosen by Professor. For History Majors, History 250 is a co-requisite or prerequisite for all upper-level courses.

HIST 255 Great Debates: Patriots, Rebels, & Resistance Credits: 3

This course explores the elements of historical thinking, analysis, and argumentation. Topics will be chosen by the instructor and may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.

HIST 344 Conflict and Society: France WWII Credits: 3

This course examines significant conflicts in historical context by addressing the social and cultural effects of conflict upon the societies that experience them as well as the ways that societies and cultures shape the conflicts they wage. This course may be repeated for up to six credit hours under different topics.

HIST 371 The American Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

Analysis of major problems of American history from the sectional conflict over slavery and secession through the war years and the reconstruction of the nation.

HIST 372 U.S. History 1876-1917 Credits: 3

From the end of the Reconstruction to the First World War; Industrialization, Imperialism, and Reform.

HIST 383 History of the Colony and State of South Carolina Credits: 3

A study of South Carolina's origins and development and a survey of recent South Carolina history with emphasis on social and institutional development.

HIST 397-DL Digital History, Theme: Access to Digital Sources that Highlight Cross-Cultural Competence and Diversity Credits: 3

This history course investigates how the past has been rapidly digitized and explores the debates in the field of digital humanities knowledge production. From debates in the field, to theoretical approaches, to methodological practices, to technological tools, this course explores how the past has been preserved and presented in a digital format. Students critically analyze digital materials and evaluate and interpret such documents as historical primary sources, memoirs, literary works, films, photographs, artifacts, music, and art.

HIST 450 The City in European History Credits: 3

This course provides an overview European urbanization from antiquity through the present era in terms of multiple case studies.

HIST 452 Death and Human Remains in Public History Credits: 3

This course covers the various fields of Public History in the context of human experience with death and with human remains. Topics may include ethics of display and interpretation of human remains in museums and at other historical spaces, education programs at sites of death or about death, dark tourism, best practices in public history, and other themes related to death, dying, and human remains.

HIST492/HIST World War II America Credits: 3

Reading and research on selected historical subjects. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

HIST 493/HIST 320 The Cold War Credits: 3

Reading and research on selected historical subjects. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

HIST494*02 War and Genocide in Film & Fiction Credits: 3

Reading and research on serlected historical subjects. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

HIST494*E1 The Revolutionary Black Atlantic Credits: 3

Reading and research on serlected historical subjects. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

LANGUAGES AND INTERCULTURAL STUDIES

SPAN 115-05 & -13: Hispanic Studies I Credits: 3

SPAN 115 introduces students to different cultural aspects from Hispanic cultures. Students must research and engage in presentations and discussions about Hispanic cultures so that they can better understand people with these backgrounds.

SPAN 115*04, *07, *09, *18, and *25 Credits: 3

Introduces students to different cultural aspects from Hispanic cultures. Students must research and engage in presentations and discussions about Hispanic cultures so that they can better understand people with these backgrounds.

SPAN 115 introduces students to different cultural aspects from Hispanic cultures. Students must research and engage in presentations and discussions about Hispanic cultures so that they can better understand people with these backgrounds.

SPAN 115*D1 Credits: 3

SPAN 115 introduces students to different cultural aspects from Hispanic cultures. Students must research and engage in presentations and discussions about Hispanic cultures so that they can better understand people with these backgrounds.

Span 210*01 and *03 Hispanic Studies II Credits: 3

This class focuses on different cultural aspects from various Hispanic cultures. Students learn about Hispanic people, and traditions through weekly lectures, readings, presentations, research, and discussions (oral and written) so that they can have a better understanding of Hispanic people throughout the world.

SPAN 211-02 Spanish/Hispanic Cultures in North America Credits: 3

SPAN 211 focuses on Hispanic cultures in North America. Students learn about Hispanic people living in Canada, the United States, and Mexico through lectures, readings, presentations, research, and discussions (oral and written) so that they can have a better understanding of Hispanics in this region of the world.

SPAN 345 (01) Spanish Through Art Credits: 3

Introduces students to the Latin American multi-ethnicity and multiculturality through the art of the best painters from Latin America and Spain. Students must research and engage in presentations and discussions about the themes and artistic styles, so that they can better understand the indigenous, black, mestizo and European people.

FREN*115*03 and *06 Credits: 3

This course makes a substantive and significant contribution to students’ understanding and appreciation for diversity. It introduces students to the various cultures represented by French speakers all around the world.

FREN*210 Credits: 3

This course makes a substantive and significant contribution to students’ understanding and appreciation for diversity. It introduces students to the various cultures represented by French speakers all around the world.

FREN*211 Credits: 3

This course makes a substantive and significant contribution to students’ understanding and appreciation for diversity. It introduces students to the various cultures represented by French speakers all around the world.

LIS*308*01 & FRE* 308L*01 Credits: 3

This course makes a substantive and significant contribution to students’ understanding and appreciation for diversity. It introduces students to the various cultures represented by French speakers all around the world, insisting on the topic of Colonial Representations in French and Francophone Comics and Cartoons.

GERM 311-01: German Conversation Credits: 3

This is a conversation course focused on issues of identity, race, and gender in Germany. The course makes use of popular music and popular visual art, news stories about political debates within government and in more casual contexts like sports, as well as first-hand accounts from Germans with migration backgrounds. After engaging with the source material students use German to reflect on, and discuss, what they've learned.

ITAL 115.04. Italian Studies I Credits: 3

This course addresses questions of diversity, equity, and inclusion in relation to Italian language and national identity through the analysis of music lyrics and video documentaries such as 18 ius soli.

LIS 412.01 Mafia Movies Credits: 3

This course addresses questions of diversity, equity, and inclusion as portrayed in Italian and American cinema and TV series.

LIS 122*D2 and *D3 Transnational Cinema Credits: 3

The course has a strong DEI content. Contemporary issues concerning immigration, social and gender inequality, and the North-South divide are discussed at length in the context of world film; so, too, is the critical issue of the environmental health of our planet— the athropocene.

LIS/RELG 340 Chinese Religions and Philosophy Credits: 3

In this class, students will come to understand diversity in terms of Chinese ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, language, culture, and political perspectives. This allows students to examine their own racial and ethnic identities in relation to that of others as well as scrutinize otherness and the process of "othering." Familiarity with our topics serves to combat religious, ethnic, and other forms of discrimination. Students will also come to understand a variety of perspectives on the requisites for a civil society through open dialogs and critical inquiry into Chinese social concepts including collectivism (jiāguó), benevolence (rén), and trustworthiness (xin). In addition, students will learn about Chinese communities in diaspora and some of the challenges they face in terms of discrimination.

LIS 402*01 Gender and Sexuality in German and Austrian Culture Credits: 3

This classes focusses on social and cultural change regarding gender identity, performance, and expression in early twentieth-century Europe with a special focus on women’s emancipation and the emerging LGBTQ community. The role of literature, art, film, politics, law and law enforcement, economics, science, and other areas in representing, promoting, and/or obstructing social change will be examined.

Russian 115 Credits: 3

This class will introduce students to the foundation of Russian language. In addition to acquiring the basic reading, speaking and listening skills in Russian, students will learn about the diverse Russian speaking world. Students will become familiar with historical & cultural heritage of Russia and former Soviet countries like Ukraine, Belarus, Georgia and Kazakhstan.

Russian 210 Credits: 3

This class will continue to develop reading, speaking and listening skills in Russian. In addition, students will learn about the diverse Russian speaking world. They will become familiar with historical & cultural heritage of Russia and former Soviet countries like Ukraine, Belarus, Georgia and Kazakhstan.

MUSIC

MCJ 381 Improv and Jazz/Pop Theory Credits: 3

Prereq: MUS 116 and MUS 118) A course open to all musicians interested in improving in a jazz or popular music context. Course includes an introduction to jazz/pop chord symbols, modes, chord-scale relationships, rhythmic styles, and basic repertoire associated with the jazz performance tradition. Additional components include voice-leading, transcription and analysis, self-transcription and analysis formal structures, and repertoire building (a tune list.).

MUS 124S World Percussion Credits: 1

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to study and perform music of various cultures from around the world. Over the course of the semester students will analyze and discuss aspects of traditional performance practice as well as receive hands on training playing non-western percussion instruments. Each semester the class will give several public performances, both on and off campus, with an emphasis on achieving high musical standards.

MUS 207 Introduction to World Music Credits: 3

This course introduces the fundamentals of music to the non-music major through a survey of world music traditions. Music making within specific cultural settings that give context and meaning to performance will be examined. This course draws upon the broad interdisciplinary field of ethnomusicology, whic provides insights into music's role as a rich form of human creative expression. Experience in music is not required..

MUS 257 American Popular Music (2 sections) Credits: 3

A survey of American Popular Music from the 19th Century to the present. This music is explored regarding its musical characteristics, its relationship to the European classical tradition and where appropriate, its role as social commentary.

THEATRE

THEA 321 Q Applied Theatre Credits: 3

This class explores techniques, methodology and history of applied theatre focusing on social change, current events and/or social justice. Class includes experiential learning projects with targeted populations and/or non-profit organizations.

THEA 425 World Dramatic Literature Credits: 3

(=ENGL 425) A critical and historical survey of the cardinal works of dramatic literature across the epochs of theatrical performance. The course accents analysis and interpretation.

VISUAL ARTS

ARTD 499 – Special Topics in Visual Communication Design

taught in conjunction with HFA 391 Press Project Workshop Credits: 3

(Prereq: BFA major only, ARTD*308) In-depth investigation of specific topics and media not generally available in the curriculum.

This course introduces students to and involves them in the hands-on work of a university press. Students will help to develop press projects and will work on a variety of print and digital components. Participants will learn and practice various steps in the publication process and the production of multimedia content. Activities and themes will change based on current press projects. This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours.


MASTER OF ARTS LIBERAL STUDIES

MALS*600*D1 Core Seminar

This seminar, whose title will be changed to “Interdisciplinarity and Diversity,” introduces students to research approaches that take into account the diversity of experiences, viewpoints, academic training, and social and cultural identities relevant to issues of current significance. Content will focus in particular on African-American, LGBTQ, and women’s experiences.

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