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Something to Talk About Personal notes and news.

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  • CCU student breaks powerlifting world records

    September 5 2017

    Tyi Richards, a senior sociology major at Coastal Carolina University, is finishing up her last week of training in the HTC Center in preparation for the Amateur World Powerlifting Congress (AWPC) Worlds Competition on Sept. 8. She will travel to Lisle, Ill., to represent Team USA.

    Back in May, Richards competed in the Amateur American Powerlifting Federation (AAPF) Nationals competition and won first place in junior class and 181 pound weight class. She also placed first in the women’s open 181 pound weight class.

    Adding to her already impressive accomplishments, she recently broke seven world records in squats, deadlift and total weight. Right now, her current total lift is 959 pounds.

    Richards spends her day balancing academics, powerlifting and working at the HTC Center. It is not easy, but she says she makes it work and does her best to get her assignments done early.

    “I remember meeting her at Orientation in 2016,” said Jody Davis, director of university recreation. “She was standing in the hallway staring at the weights upstairs. I hired her on the spot and the rest is history. She is a very popular staff member here, and her records indicate she represents Coastal Carolina well.”

    Richards began powerlifting about a year ago when the track team was cut at her last school. “I had always been passionate about lifting, and I just decided to take it to the next level,” she said. Sticking to a strict gym schedule can be tough, but Richards says it makes showing off her hard work at each competition worth it.

    She highly encourages other students to try out powerlifting or any new activity they want to pursue. “If you are passionate about it, go for it,” she said. “Don't wait until the last minute. Follow your dream!”

    Powerlifting keeps Richards busy, but she is very focused on her career goals. After graduation in May, she plans to apply for an internship with the FBI with the hopes of one day working there.

  • Coastal Carolina Athletics holds hurricane relief drive

    August 29 2017

    The Coastal Carolina University Department of Athletics is conducting a relief drive to assist those in Houston affected by Hurricane Harvey and the flooding in its aftermath.

    Coastal Carolina students and staff, as well as community members, are encouraged to participate in the relief efforts.

    The most pressing needs for those affected by the flooding are cleaning supplies and toiletries. Please refer to the list below to view preferred donations.

    Please note: Clothes and furniture WILL NOT BE accepted.

    Individuals who are interested in donating supplies can bring their items to Arcadia Hall (132 Chanticleer Dr. West) on the campus of Coastal Carolina. For further questions regarding donations, please contact Cari Rosiek of the Department of Athletics (cari@coastal.edu | 843-349-4126).

    “The Coastal Carolina Department of Athletics is once again willing and eager to assist those that have had their lives disrupted by a natural disaster,” said Rosiek. “Last September we held a successful drive to help those affected by flooding in Louisiana, and we would like to replicate that effort to help the people of Houston. As a community that felt the effects of a hurricane last fall, we can certainly empathize with the people of Houston and their current situation.”

    Lewis Truck Lines Inc. has once again graciously donated its services to assist with the relief drive, and will transport all donated goods once the drive is complete.

    ITEMS IN NEED
    CLEANING KITS FOR FAMILIES (items placed in buckets for distribution)
    BucketsBleach Cleaning Solutions/Detergents
    `Shockwave' for mold
    Mops
    Brooms
    Paper towels
    Large garbage bags
    Rubber gloves
    Masks
    Scrub
    Brushes
    Scouring pads
    Sponges
    Air freshener

    Vinegar

    TOILETRIES
    Toothbrushes
    Toothpaste
    Hand sanitizer (travel size)
    Shampoo and conditioner
    First aid supplies
    Paper Towels
    Cloth Towels (wash cloths, bath towels, hand towels etc.)
    Bar soap
    Hand soap
    Pull-up disposable adult diapers
    Feminine hygiene supplies (napkins, tampons)
    Disposable razors and shaving cream

    MISCELLANEOUS
    Bottled water
    Nonperishable food items
    School supplies

    Pet supplies 

  • CCU student Brandon Brown finishes in top 20 at Darlington Raceway

    September 3 2017

    Coastal Carolina student Brandon Brown finished 20th in the NASCAR Xfinity Series Sport Clips Haircuts VFW 200 race Sept. 2 at Darlington Raceway.

    Brown, a part-time driver in both the Xfinity and Camping World Truck series, started 31st in the No. 90 Chevrolet painted with a Chanticleers theme.

    "I'm very excited to represent Coastal Carolina University on our Brandonbilt Motorsports number 90 at Darlington, Too Tough Too Tame," said Brown. It was his 31st National Series start, and his 9th in the NASCAR Xfinity Series.

    On Aug. 29, there was an unveiling of Brown’s CCU-sponsored Xfinity car on Tradition Lawn. Bill Plate, vice president for university communication, introduced Brown and the sponsorship.

    The car was painted with a Dick Trickle throwback paint scheme to represent Brown’s home state of Virginia for the Darlington Race. Trickle was known as the sport's greatest local short-track racer before his death in 2013.

    The unveilong took place during a CCU pep rally organized by athletics and student life departments. 

    In 2014, Brown raced in his first NASCAR National Series race at Iowa Speedway. He is a junior, studying communication and marketing.

  • Dual keynotes mark CCRC fifth anniversary

    September 5 2017

    The Campus and Community Research Collaborative (CCRC) celebrates its fifth anniversary on Thursday, Oct. 12, with an expanded program across multiple venues. 

    CCRC kicks off with its Newcomers Orientation in Johnson Auditorium at 8:30 a.m. Breakout sessions immediately follow at 10 a.m. Pre-registration is requested. Attendees may register for the specific activities or the entire day at coastal.edu/ccrc.

    Dual keynotes will be hosted in Wheelwright Auditorium at 11:30 a.m. Both represent the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Controls. Myra Reece, director Environmental Affairs, oversees DHEC’s Office of Environmental Quality Control and Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management. Nick Davidson, director of Community Health Services, ensures service delivery of DHEC’s community health clinics.

    The signature of CCRC remains its speed-dating luncheon scheduled in Atheneum Hall at 1 p.m. During this time, faculty engage with community partners to yield dynamic student learning outcomes.

    CCRC is supported by the Office of the Provost and the Office of the Vice President for Research & Emerging Initiatives.

    For more information, contact Amy Edmunds at aedmunds@coastal.edu or 843-349-2441 or Miranda Brenneman at 843-349-4035.

  • Albergotti's poems go public

    August 29 2017

    One of Dan Albergotti's poems, “Weapons Discharge Report,” is being reprinted in the prestigious "Best American Poetry 2017," which comes out Sept. 5. "It’s a very atypical poem for me," said Albergotti.

    At the end of October, he will take part in a reading with a number of other contributors to this year’s edition of the anthology at The New School in New York:

    http://www.clubfreetime.com/new-york-city-nyc/free-poetry-reading/2017-09-28/event/353734

    Also, his poem "Things to do in the belly of a whale" has been selected by Wall Poems in Charlotte as part of a public art project, and it has been painted on the side of an old Goodyear building at 516 N. College Street that will be demolished within the next several months. Curiously, the painting is of an octopus instead of a whale. "But it still looks great," said the poet/professor.

    http://www.wallpoems.com/things-to-do-in-the-belly-of-the-whale-by-dan-albergotti.html

    Albergotti is professor and chair of the Department of English at Coastal Carolina University.

     

  • CCU veterans receive Quilts of Valor

    August 30 2017

    Two Coastal Carolina University students recently received Quilts of Valor from the Quilts of Valor Foundation (Region 8) at the Veteran’s Café in Myrtle Beach; both are Student Veterans Association work study students.

    Shebbena McGrew, a senior and a ROTC cadet majoring in biology, and Justin Sterbenz, a senior majoring in management, received quilts recently. McGrew will be an Army Non-Commissioned Officer SGT (E-5) when she graduates. Sterbenz will be Army enlisted, Specialist (E-4). He was a member of the prestigious “Old Guard” at Fort Myer, Va., guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and serving in parades and funerals.

    CCU staff members Greg Nance, Porter Medley and Denny Powers also received quilts at the military appreciation baseball game.

    Powers, director of the Office of Veteran Services, retired as a Commissioned Chief Warrant Officer Four(CW-4) Criminal Investigation Division Special Agent. He was deployed to the Persian Gulf for Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. He served in the Army near the end of the Vietnam war but never deployed to Vietnam. He served 22 years and retired in 1994.

    Nance was Army Non-Commissioned Officer retired as a SGT (E-5) and works as the Military Funding Coordinator in the Office of Veterans Services and is a graduate student at Liberty University majoring in military resilience. He had eight years of service and one deployment to Afghanistan for Operation Enduring Freedom.

    Medley, senior director of conference services, scheduling and event services, is retired Navy. Porter was a Petty Officer First Class (E-6) and served 20 years.
     

  • New grants administration coordinator named

    August 30 2017

    Patty Huffman has joined CCU's Office of Sponsored Programs and Research Services (OSPRS) as grants administration coordinator. She earned a master’s degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and comes to CCU with grants management experience in nonprofit, county and local government agencies.

    “In addition to her professional experience and extensive background in this field, you will find that her warm energy, combined with a flexibility to take whatever comes each day, makes her the perfect fit for her new role,” said Stephanie J. Cassavaugh, director and IRB administrator.
     
    If you have questions or need assistance with understanding award terms, preparing sponsor reports or other deliverables, navigating internal processes for hiring, compensation or purchasing, financial questions or would like award management training or resources, please reach out to her at your convenience.

    Huffman's office is located at 450-B Century Circle. She can be reached at 843- 349-3445, or phuffman@coastal.edu.
     

  • CCU alumna Sara Becker wins national prize

    August 29 2017

    Sara Becker, a CCU alumna with a major in art studio–printmaking specialization, became the first recipient of Volcom’s prize for “Using Art to Combat the Stigma of Mental Illness.” 

    Volcom, a Southern California-based lifestyle brand and sports company, sought out talented individuals who wanted to prioritize their passions and get paid for it. Their #ThisFirst contest asked those who entered to answer the question: “What’s your ‘this’ and what would it mean for you to put #ThisFirst?” More than 10,000 passionate people entered the contest, with only 15 winners chosen in total: five national winners and 10 global winners, all with unique passions, from music, to cliff jumping, and much more. 

    For the 23-year old Philly native, Becker's plan to use her art to advocate for mental health was her ‘this.’ Growing up with a father who has schizophrenia forced her to combat society’s negative ideas about mental illness, and to challenge her perception of her father’s actions.  

    When Becker saw the call for submissions to #ThisFirst on Facebook, she had just graduated from CCU in May 2017 with a bachelor's degree in art studio.

     “I had confidence in myself, but everyone always says, ‘Oh, you can’t get a career in art very easily.’” So when Becker decided to put together her submission video, she never imagined that her video would be the one Volcom picked.

    Read her story here. https://www.hercampus.com/school/drexel/local-volcom-thisfirst-winner-using-art-combat-stigma-mental-illness
     

  • CCU Track and Field staff named

    August 18 2017

    Coastal Carolina director of track and field Sandy Fowler has completed her staff for the upcoming season as Dionne Henley, Mike Embry and Benjamin Yocum join the Chanticleer programs as assistant coaches.
     
    Henley, a two-time Olympian (1992 and 1996), will focus on the sprints, hurdles and relays for the Chanticleer men’s and women’s track and field programs. Henley spent the past seven years at Central Michigan (2010-16). She worked with the long sprints and relays for Mark Guthrie's combined men's and women's track and field program.
     
    Embry, a two-sport athlete at Eastern Illinois University (football and track and field), will focus on the jumps. Embry spent the past three years at his alma mater coaching jumps and sprinters. In 2016 and 2017, he guided three of his athletes to the NCAA West Regional, with two ranked in the top 100 nationally
    .
    Yocum, a native of Charlotte, N.C., will focus primarily on the pole vault and multi-events. Yocum spent the past seven years at College of Charleston working with hurdles, throws, and multi-events. In his time he has guided seven athletes to standing school records and one NCAA Prelim qualifier.
     
    For complete coverage of CCU track and field, follow the Chanticleers on social media at @CoastalTFXC(twitter) or visit the official home of Coastal Carolina Athletics at goccusports.com.
     

  • New program serves as information hub for CCU family members

    August 18 2017

    By Megan Foster, Student Writer

    Coastal Carolina University has partnered with a new service that allows families to receive updates and information about CCU, from tips to adjusting to life without your student to events on campus and more.

    The Family Experience Portal, a website run by CampusESP, launched this past June at CCU. CampusESP is a platform that gives families college specific news and information, with the goal of increasing family engagement.
    Participants create a profile and choose which campus communities they want to receive information from and how often they would like to receive it. There is a calendar with important dates, CCU resources and a support section offered on the site in addition to the dashboard of CCU information. Not every office on campus has a specific community on the program, but they can still send information through the site.

    Some of the communities that generate posts on the site are:

    • Coastal News
    • Parent & Family News
    • Financial Aid & Scholarships
    • News from the Family Council
    • Student Support

    The portal is available as a free application that can be downloaded to mobile devices, and it includes a digital newsletter with curated, personalized content.

    Susannah Marshman, director for new student and family programs, discovered CampusESP while attending a conference, and the site really stuck with her. “I knew we needed something to amp up our communication with family members, and this seemed like a good fit for what we needed as well as what our family members need,” she said.

    The Office of New Student and Family Programs often receives requests directly from parents who want a program specifically for family information, specifically university updates that are not just emails or social media posts. Barbara McGuinness, mother of a CCU senior said, “I really enjoy getting as much CCU news as I can. The Family Experience Portal has allowed me to stay up to date with what’s going on around campus without relying on my student to get the information for me.”

    The Family Experience Portal creates a centralized place to easily access information. Participants can comment on posts and ask questions that will be answered directly by the specific department they are trying to reach. There are also options available to sign up for text messages and email alerts within the Family Experience Portal.

    For more information about CampusESP or the Family Experience Portal, contact Susannah Marshman at 843-349-2027. To sign up for the Family Experience Portal, visit https://coastal.campusesp.com/users/sign_in.
     

  • Thompson gets promotion

    August 24 2017

    Greg Thompson has been named associate vice fresident for finance and University controller at Coastal Carolina University. He will be responsible for providing stewardship with the financial assets of the university and overseeing the areas of accounts payable, accounts receivable, tax, general accounting, e-commerce, payroll, student accounts, treasury and the internal controls and compliance requirements surrounding those areas.
     
    Thompson began his career at CCU in 2009 as a staff accountant and served as deputy controller for the past six years. He is a certified public accountant with an undergraduate degree in accounting from USC. Thompson earned an MBA from CCU in 2009.
     

  • Animal crackers: More stories from CCU petlovers

    August 7 2017

    As promised, here are more pet stories and pictures from the Coastal Carolina University community, as told in the pet lovers' own words. Send us your stories and photos to mprufer@coastal.edu, and we'll keep running them.

    Jennifer L. Altieri, program coordinator, Spadoni College of Education

    My seven-year-old son and I had a 16-year young pug we had to put to sleep the summer of 2016. I knew the day was quickly approaching and thought a puppy would make it easier on my son.

    I picked the breed, and he picked the name. Neville Longbottom (who was almost named Albus Dumbledore) was purchased from Adore Frenchies in Chapel Hill, N.C. Neville looked so sweet and innocent the day we got him.

    He’s now turned one year old, and he’s gradually settling down. Emphasis is on gradually. His loves include finding my shoes when the closet door is left open, salivating copious amounts of liquid when focused on anything, belching loud and clear after inhaling a bowl of food, and terrorizing my son. He is learning to put up with us, just as we are adjusting to life with a Frenchie.

    Mona Prufer, media relations coordinator, Univeristy Communication

    Rusty and Willow are our furry family. Rusty is a Chow-Golden-Shepherd mix, and Willow is our three-legged Maine Coon cat. Rusty was a rescue from the Horry County Shelter. We had just lost Moose, our mostly German Shepherd of 10 years (also a shelter dog), so we had gone through a grieving period of several months. My husband Kyle and I were both secretly looking on petfinder.com, and one day he sent me this picture of a very forlorn-looking doggie they had named Rufus.

    We went to meet him, and the shelter folks had to drag him out of the cage, he was so scared. We loved him right away and took him home. He peed on everything in the house just that one time (and not since), then he went out and dug about a million holes in the backyard. He was home. Rusty is the sweetest, most even-tempered dog we have ever had, he is now about five years old and loves his squeaky purple pig and hedgehog toys. He also loves to eat, and in early summer he eats beetles crossing the street on his early morning walk.

    Willow found us. He camped out in a willow tree we had in the front yard of a previous house, crying piteously as he had a hurt paw. We already had a dog and a cat and a good balance, so we didn’t really want another cat. So, we said let’s take him to the vet and get his leg fixed, then find him a good home! Well, the vet called and said the leg had to come off. It was an old injury, and she said it would forever bother him. So, $850 later, we had an angry, three-legged cat that looked like a plucked chicken (from the shaving for surgery) because you cannot give away a three-legged cat. And, of course, he is a wonderful, sweet boy whom we couldn’t love more than we do.