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For Faculty

Post A Research Opportunity

Faculty form to post a research opportunity for students, click here

Submit Citations of Presented or Published Research by Students

Faculty form to submit a citation of a CCU student's research, click here

The Office for Undergraduate Research recognizes that the strength of a research institution is having faculty committed to scholarly development and inquiry across a range of fields. Be sure to take advantage of this resource to post research opportunities in your field.

We invite University faculty to share and enrich their research expertise in one-on-one mentorships with undergraduates. By posting your undergraduate research opportunity on this web site, students will be able to:

  • Search for your opportunity by relevant research area;
  • Search for your opportunity by keyword;
  • Read your project description; and,
  • E-mail you if they are interested in the opportunity.

If more than one position is available within the same project, you may choose to post each separately OR include a list of the positions within the same description.

Engaging Undergraduates

Steps Toward Selecting A Student

• Get the word out! Post your research opportunity on this web site.
• Identify an application process for interested students (e.g., consider a combination of written materials and interview).
• Try to ascertain the level of intellectual independence of student applicants (e.g., may consider past accomplishments, extra-curricular activities, and interest level).
• Define your role as a faculty research mentor.

Set Up & Communicate A Work Plan

• Meet with the selected student to determine the number of credits a student can earn, draw up a work and meeting schedule, and benchmark anticipated accomplishments.
• Provide an orientation to introduce the student to other group members and the payroll process (if paid position) and to go over expected work habits.
• Establish from the outset what work habits are important to you and the project, such as showing up when expected, documenting and following through on project work.
• Identify any specific training the student will need, and how she or he will go about getting the training. Are there independent study materials, or will you or your designee do the training one-on-one? How quickly do you expect the student to master required skills, and how should she or he practice those skills?

Keep Communications Open

• Be sure that students regularly report to you or your designee to:
o discuss their progress;
o ask questions; and,
o review resources and documentation of research.
• Written project status reports are a good idea as it helps the student integrate the details of their day-to-day work into a larger research framework.

Identify Benchmarks & Recognize Accomplishments

• Help the student identify the key measures of quality research in the project.
• Students often feel very frustrated in a research setting, so be sure to recognize their accomplishments, large and small, as their work progresses. You may need to help them understand that in many cases frustration is an integral part of moving forward.

Maintain A Research Log Or Notebook

• Students should keep notes of what they do and record results regularly for their own records and in some cases so that another student or researcher may continue the project after the student leaves.
• Many students do not know how to keep a research notebook, so an example would be helpful. Be sure to discuss any proprietary issues concerning the student's research, particularly if it is a part of an ongoing and/or funded project.
• A common problem is student-generated software on protocols that are impossible for others to run once the student is gone.
• Be sure the student is conducting research in an ethical manner.

Encourage Students To Present and Fund Their Work

• Tell the student about CCU events at which students may present their work to faculty and peers, including annual Undergraduate Research Competition each spring.
• Students who have had noteworthy accomplishments may benefit from presenting professional conferences or symposia.

(Source: www.washington.edu/research/urp/faculty/engaging.html)