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Dr. Boyle wins HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Award, Jan 5

Dr. Jen Boyle, Professor of Early Modern Literature and Coordinator of the Digital Culture and Design major, wins the 2018 HTC Distinguished Teacher Scholar Lecturer Award.  Each year, this award is given to a CCU faculty member who demonstrates outstanding teaching and who brings about student learning through scholarship and mentoring. As part of the award, Dr. Boyle will present a lecture to the public on March 20th on the transformative effects of digital technology on American life titled “Observations Upon a Blazing World: Reading, Writing and Creating in the Digital Age.”

Dr. Boyle designed and spearheaded the new Digital Culture and Design program, a cross-disciplinary major already popular among students in its first year due to her innovative teaching style and ability to connect and engage with the students she teaches and advises. She continues to explore new approaches to digital scholarship, and her work that incorporates new digital media and concepts into the critical examination of early modern literature is breaking new ground in her field. She is the author of Anamorphosis in Early Modern Literature: Mediation and Affect: Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity and the co-editor of two boosk, Digital Medieval Literature and Culture: A Routledge Handbook and The Retro-Futurism of Cuteness.

Dr. Albergotti Named Kearns Palmetto Professor, Dec 15

Dr. Dan Albergotti, Professor of Creative Writing, has been has been named CCU’s Kearns Palmetto Professor, a five-year endowed professorship granted to a CCU faculty member who has demonstrated outstanding skills as a teacher and scholar, service to the University and their profession, and who has enhanced Coastal’s national and international reach.  

Dan is a two-time Pushcart Prize award winner and the author of the poetry collections Millennial TeethThe Use of the World, and The Boatloads. His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati Review, Five Points, The Southern Review, and The Virginia Quarterly Review.

ENGL Modern Narratives Film Series presents Fences, Dec 5

The Department of English Modern Narratives Film series presents a viewing of August Wilson and Denzel Washington’s film Fences, Tuesday (Dec 5) at 5pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Fences is based on August Wilson’s 1985 play which won both a Tony Award and a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1987.  Denzel Washington directs and stars in this 2016 adaptation which takes a hard look at race and opportunity in America.  Troy Maxson is a sanitation worker in 1950s Pittsburgh who had hoped to become a pro baseball player but was considered too old when the league began admitting black athletes.  His bitterness over his own life pours over into his family when he faces his son’s chance to meet a college football recruiter.  Veronica Gerald, Assistant Professor of English, leads a discussion and cultural critique of the film following the screening.

September 2017

Benjamin Percy to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Sept 21

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a fiction reading by author Benjamin Percy, on Thursday, September 21 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Percy is a two-time Pushcart Prize winner and author of novels The Dark NetThe Dead LandsRed Moonand The Wilding; two books of short stories, Refresh, Refresh and The Language of Elk; and a craft book, Thrill Me: Essays on Fiction.  He writers the Green Arrow and Teen Titans series for DC Comics and James Bond for Dynamite Entertainment.  His fiction and nonfiction have been published in Esquire, GQ, Time, The Wall Street Journal, Tin House, Ploughshares, Glimmer, Train, McSweeney’s, and The Paris Review.  His other honors include a National Education Association fellowship, the Whiting Writer’s Award, The Plimpton Prize and inclusion in Best American Short Stories.

ENGL Modern Narratives Film Series presents Moonlight, Sept 19

The Department of English Modern Narratives Film series presents a viewing of Barry Jenkins’ Academy Award-winning film Moonlight, Tuesday (Sept 19) at 5pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Moonlight is a challenging, thoughtful, and riveting chronicle of Chiron, a young black man growing up in Miami.  As Chiron passes through childhood and adolescence into adulthood, he confronts critical issues of sexuality, identity, and the confusion of being a human in a difficult world.  Dr. Tripthi Pillai, associate professor of English, leads a discussion following the screening of the film.

August 2017

ENGL Modern Narratives Film Serices presents Get Out, Aug 29

The Department of English Modern Narratives Film series presents a viewing of Jordan Peele's Get Out, Tuesday (Aug 29) at 5pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater.  The event is free and open to the public.

Get Out is a suspense thriller that digs deeply into the fractured American psyche as it shows a young African American man visiting his white girlfriend’s estate, where he becomes trapped in a terrifying labyrinth of hypnosis, mind control, and murder.  Dr. Christian Smith, assistant professor of Rhetoric, leads a discussion and cultural critique following the film.

APRIL 2017

Laura Kochman and Zachary Tyler Vickers to speak for the Words to Say it Visiting Writers Series, Apr 13

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a poetry reading by Laura Kochman and a fiction reading by Zachary Tyler Vickers, on Thursday, April 13 at 5:30pm in the Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Laura Kochman is the author of Future Skirt (dancing girl press, 2013) and The Bone and the Body (BatCat Press, 2015). She is originally from New Jersey, but currently lives, writes, and feeds her cat in Philadelphia. She received her MFA from the University of Alabama, where she was the poetry editor for Black Warrior Review, and her recent work can be found in Pith, inter|rupture, Gigantic Sequins, Entropy, Quarterly West, The Atlas Review, and others.

Zachary Tyler Vickers is the author of the story collection, Congratulations on Your Martyrdom! which George Saunders praised:  “A debut full of heart and energy, by an intense, fervent writer whose dedication shows in every line.” He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop where he was the Provost's Fellow. He is the recipient of the Richard Yates Prize, and his stories have appeared in numerous journals.

March 2017

English Week, Mar 28-29

Come learn what CCU's English Department has to offer as we kick off English Week, our week-long celebration of the English Major.

English Trivia and Ice Cream Sundaes: On Tuesday (Mar 28) team up with your fellow English Majors and your favorite English Professors in a fun-filled trivia competition featuring English Studies questions. Prizes will be awarded.  From 4:30pm-6:00pm in the Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).

English Major Bazaar: On Wednesday (Mar 29) gather with the entire English Department to share dinner and information about the upcoming fall 2017 English courses.  Additionally, hear presentations on internships and future job opportunities specifically for English Majors.  From 4:30p-6:30p in the Edwards Courtyard.

For more info contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

Elena Passarello to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Mar 30

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a creative nonfiction reading by author Elena Passarello, on Thursday, March 30 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Elena Passarello is the author of the essay collections Let Me Clear My Throat and Animals Strike Curious Poses.  She won the Independent Publishers’ gold medal for nonfiction and was a finalist for the Oregon Book Award for Let Me Clear My Throat.  Her essays on pop culture, music, performing arts, and the natural world have recently appeared in Oxford American, Creative Nonfiction, Virginia Quarterly Review, Slate, Iowa Review, and Normal School as well as the anthologies After Montaigne  and I’ll Tell You Mine. Originally from Charleston, SC, Passarello is an assistant professor of English at Oregon State University.

February 2017

Scholars' Symposium, Feb 2

Join us Thursday, February 2nd in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our first Scholars' Symposium of 2017. We will have one presentation by Dr. Anna Oldfield on censorship in the former USSR and how it can both repress and encourage artistic expression using the example of epic singers in Soviet controlled Azerbaijan.  We will have an additional presentation by one of our advanced undergraduate students Zach Thomas who will explore the rhetoric of multilingualism and code switching in the work of Richard Lanham. 

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

December 2016

Torry ‌Green Wins 21st Paul Rice Broadside Contest, Dec 9

The Coastal Carolina English Department is pleased to announce the winner of the 21st Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest.

The final judge, poet Alan Michael Parker, selected “Sonnet for a Sick Mother” by Victoria Green as the winner.  Victoria will receive a $100.00 prize and 25 copies of the broadside, which will be produced in an edition of 100 numbered copies.

Commenting on the winning poem, Parker writes:  “The overlapping and inlaid syntax of ‘Sonnet for a Sick Mother’ work beautifully together to create a complex portrait of ambivalence and love. There’s friction and fractiousness here, loss and lament, and the form complements the content spectacularly. I’m moved by the results. A terrific poem!”

Parker also awarded honorable mention to Hallie Bond’s “Separate Transactions,” and Alice Kitchen’s “The Monument of a Memory.”

Those wishing to acquire a copy of the broadside of “Sonnet for a Sick Mother” (or previous Paul Rice contest winners) should contact Jason Ockert. The deadline for the 22nd contest in the Paul Rice series will be announced soon.

Scholars' Symposium, Dec 8

Join us Thursday, December 8th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our December Scholars' Symposium. We will have one presentation by Dr. Alan Reid discussing his study of metacomprehension, metacognition, and student calibration.  Additionally we will have a presentation by Dr. Cindy Port who will lead a collaborative discussion of the end goal of age studies and the tensions between studying and helping the population.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

November 2016

Scholars' Symposium, Nov 17

Join us Thursday, November 17th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our November Scholars' Symposium. We will have one presentation by Dr. Tripthi Pillai discussing Contagion Theory within Shakespeare’s Othello.  Additionally we will have a presentation by Jeremy Griffin (MFA) as he reads to us from his new creative nonfiction work.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

Johnathan Fink to speak for the Words to Say it Visiting Writers Series, Nov 10

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a poetry reading by author Johnathan Fink, on Thursday, November 10 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Johnathan Fink will be reading from his poetry collection The Crossing and his book of sonnets Barbarossa: The German Invasion of the Soviet Union and the Siege of Leningrad. Fink is associate professor and director of creative writing at the University of West Florida, and his poems and essays have appeared in Poetry, The New York Times Magazine, New England Review, The Southern Review, and Virginia Quarterly Review.  He has received the Editors’ Prize in Poetry from The Missouri Review and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and Emory University.

ENGL Dept Film Series presents Rashomon, Nov 1

The English Department Film Series presents a viewing of Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950) Tuesday Nov 1 at 5pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater.  An informal discussion of the film will follow.  This event is free and open to the public.

Rashomon has been described as “a riveting psychological thriller that investigates the nature of truth and the meaning of justice.”  In this film, four people testify with contradictory versions of a man’s murder and the assault of his wife.  Following the film, Dr. Anna Oldfield and Dr. Christian Smith lead a discussion on the film’s cinematic style and historical significance.

 

October 2016

October Scholars' Symposium, Oct 20

Join us Thursday, October 20th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our October Scholars' Symposium. This month we have have a special meeting.  We will have one presentation from Dr. Denise Paster, Dr. J. Daniel Hasty, and Dr. Becky Childs discussing composition theory and sociolinguistic theory in the development of some of the Digital Badges here at CCU and how they can support linguistic diversity and uphold the CCCC and NCTE Students' Rights to Their Own Language position statement.  Additionally, we will have 3 presentations from MAW students Nick Powell, Tom Minton, and Rhonda Taylor from their individual final projects.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

Sonya Huber to speak for the Words to Say it Visiting Writers Series, Oct 20

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a creative nonfiction reading by author Sonya Huber, on Thursday, October 20 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Sonya Huber is the author of five books, including three books of creative nonfiction: Opa Nobody, Cover Me: A Health Insurance Memoir, and Pain Woman Takes Your Keys (forthcoming in 2017).  Her work has been published in literary journals and magazines including The New York Times, Creative Nonfiction, Brevity, Fourth Genre, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Washington Post Magazine. She teaches in the Department of English at Fairfield University and in the Fairfield Low-Residency MFA Program.

September 2016

Michael Martone to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Sept 22

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a fiction reading by award-winning author Michael Martone, on Thursday, September 22 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow. A question and answer session for CCU undergraduate and graduate students and faculty will be held with the author at 4:00pm in Edwards 164 before the reading.

Michael Martone is professor of English at the University of Alabama. His most recent books are WinesburgIndianaFour for a QuarterNot NormalIllinois: Peculiar Fiction from the Flyover, and Double-wide. Martone has won two fellowships from the National Education Association and a grant from the Ingram Merrill Foundation. His stories have won awards in the Italian Americana fiction contest, the Florida Review Short Story Contest and the Story magazine Short Story Contest.

ENGL Dept Film Series presents Sholay, Sept 20

The English Department Film Series presents a viewing of Sholay Tuesday, September 20th at 5pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater. Sholay is being presented by Dr. Tripthi Pillai.  An informal discussion of the film’s cinematic style and cultural significance will follow.  This event is free and open to the public.

Regarded as one of Bollywood's epic films, Sholay (1975) is an action-adventure story that follows two criminals, Jai and Veeru, hired by the village head, Thakur, to capture a merciless bandit named Gabbar Singh.

Cornel West speaks at inauguration of the IGADS, Sept 16

Dr. Cornel West presents the keynote address at the inauguration of the Institute of Gullah and African Diaspora Studies (IGADS) on Friday, September 17, at 7pm in Wheelwright Auditorium. IGADS was established in Spring 2016 at CCU to foster interdisciplinary examinations of Gullah culture and to explore local and global effects of the African Diaspora as they relate to contemporary issues.  The work of the institute centers upon the interactions and interconnections among various local national and global actors, peoples and their societies, and provides students with experiential learning opportunities both locally and abroad.  Admission is free and open to the public, but a ticket is required.  For more information contact Veronica Gerald Direction of IGADS.  Sponsored by the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts and the Nancy Smith Distinguished Visiting Lecturer series.

Dr. West is professor of philosophy and Christian practice at Union Theological Seminary and Professor Emeritus at Princeton University and has written more than 20 books, most notable Race Matters and Democracy Matters.

September Scholars’ Symposium, Sep 15

Join us Thursday, September 15th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our September Scholars' Symposium. We will have a special presentation from Dr. Steve HamelmanDr. Ray Moye, and Dr. Anna Oldfield as they each discuss their experiences teaching this summer  abroad in China .

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

March 2016

March Scholars' Symposium, Mar 31

Join us Thursday, March 31th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our March Scholars' Symposium. We will have a joint presentation by Dr. Emma Howes and Dr. Christian Smith and another presentation by Dr. Keagan Turner.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Sarah Navin wins 20th Paul Rice Broadside Contest, Mar 21

The Coastal Carolina English Department is pleased to announce "Persephone's Handmaidens" by Sarah Navin as the winner of the 20th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest. This poem was selected by the final judge poet Adam Vines (University of Alabama, Birmingham). Sarah will receive a $100.00 prize and 25 copies of the broadside, which will be produced by the end of the semester in an edition of 100 numbered copies.

Commenting on his selection of the winning poem, Vines writes, "Sarah Navin's "Persephone's Handmaidens" creates a distinct yet subtle movement from innocence to an early formation of mature identity. The voice, while building anxieties, resists inflation and cheap tricks within this devalued mythos, while deftly capturing the dangers and excitement of enticement."

Vines also awarded honorable mention to Victoria Greene's "A Sestina for Spring" and Mike Kane's "Dubiety and Doré."

The broadside of "Persephone's Handmaidens" will be available by the end of the semester. Those wishing to acquire a copy of the broadside (or previous Paul Rice contest winners) should contact Hastings Hensel. The deadline for the 21th contest in the Paul Rice series will be announced early in the fall semester 2016.

English Week, Mar 14-18

Come learn what CCU's English Department has to offer as we kick off English Week, our week long celebration of the English Major as well as recruitment initiative. During the day, visit our table in the Edwards lobby to get ENGL Dept. swag and talk to some of our majors to learn more about the English Major, our various Minors, and our upcoming course offerings. Then, each night join us for a special event including food. (click here for pictures of last year's English Week)

For more info contact Joan Trupiano

Monday: Words to Say It ReadingJoin us for a reading by critically acclaimed creative-nonfiction writer Meghan Daum. A book signing and light reception will follow.  Beginning at 5:30p in the Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).

Tuesday: Ice Cream and a Movie. Hang out with fellow majors and ENGL Dept. faculty as we build our own ice cream sundae and then stick around as Dr. Howes presents the film Born in Flames. A panel discussion will follow.  Beginning at 5:00p in the Student Union Rotunda.

Wednesday: Team Trivia.  Team up with your friends and your favorite ENGL Dept. faculty in a fun-filled trivia competition featuring English Studies questions submitted by ENGL Dept. faculty. Prizes will be awarded.  Beginning at 5:00pm in the Black Box Theatre (Edwards 117).

Thursday: Talent Night.  Join us as ENGL Dept. students and faculty present their many talents in the first ever English Talent Night hosted by Dr. Hasty.  Beginning at 5:00pm in the Black Box Theatre (Edwards 117).

Call for submission to the 20th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest, March 4

The English Department is pleased to announce the 20th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series contest.  The Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series (named in honor and memory of Paul Rice, professor of English at CCU 1987-2004) is a poetry competition open to current Coastal Carolina undergraduate students.  Poems must be submitted through email to Hastings Hensel, Interim Coordinator of Creative Writing, by Friday, March 4th.  Poems can be no more than 40 lines long.  There is no restriction regarding subject, style, or form.  The winning poem will be selected by an outside judge to be named at a later time.  The winning poet (to be announced Monday, April 4th) will receive $100, and the poem will be published as a broadside in an edition of 100 copies and will be considered for publication in Archarios.  For a complete list of rules and example poems from past winners, see the Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series website. Contact Hastings Hensel with any further questions.

AHGEP Fulbright Lectures by Dr. Saliou Dione, Mar 3

As part of CCU's Arts and Humanities Global Experience Program, we announce the next Fulbright scholars visit with two lectures by Dr. Anna Sanina on Tuesday, January 19, 2016. Dr. Saliou Dione is Distinguished Professor of African and Postcolonial Studies at the Department of Anglophone Studies, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences in Dakar. He is a founding member of the African and Postcolonial Studies Laboratory. Dr. Dione's chief research and teaching interests are: African culture; Gender and Sexuality studies; African literature (Oral and Written Literatures) and civilization (Continental Africa and the Diaspora/Africana Literature and Civilization); Identity in the contexts of migration; Globalization; Postcolonialism/Postcoloniality; Afrocentrism and Eurocentrism. Dr. Dione is presently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Center for African Studies, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, at Rutgers, where he is conducting research for the manuscript of his upcoming book on Gender, Sex, Sexuality(ies), Sexual Orientations and Sexual Identity(ies) in Postcolonial Africa.

Dr. Dione’s first talk, titled “Female Migritude as a Challenge to Masculinity(ies) in Postcolonial Africa,” will take place from 10:30a-11:30a on Thursday, March 03 in the James J. Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This talk is open to the CCU and HGTC communities and to the public. 

Dr. Dione’s second talk, titled “Roots and Routes of Pan-Africanism: Cross-Influences and New World Challenges” will take place from 5:00p-6:00p on Thrusday, March 03 in Edwards College Recital Hall (Edwards 152). This talk is open to the Coastal and HGTC communities and to the public, and there will be a brief reception that will follow the evening talk.

If you have any questions about Dr. Dione’s visit or future AHGEP Fulbright Lectures, please contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

February 2016

February Scholars' Symposium, Jan 28

Join us Thursday, February 25th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our February Scholars' Symposium. We will have one presentation by Dr. Steve Hamelman and another presentation by Dr. J. Daniel Hasty.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia including abstracts, photos, and video clips, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

ENGL Dept. Film Series presents Local Hero, Feb 18

The English Department presents a viewing of Local Hero Thursday, February 18th at 6pm in the Lib Jackson Student Union Theater. This is the next installment of the English Department Film Series, and Local Hero is being presented by Dr. David Kellogg. An informal discussion of the the themes presented in the film will follow. For more information on the English Department Film Series contact Dr. Christian Smith.

Bill Forsyth’s 1983 film Local Hero is a film so charming, so quietly funny and unassuming, that viewers may realize only later what it has done. Watching it, we know the protagonist has been transformed, but weeks later we realize that we have been changed as well. Possibly the first and greatest movie of globalization, Local Hero arrived during a time of binaries and blockbusters—the year Ronald Reagan declared the Soviet Union “The Evil Empire” as well as, not coincidentally, the year the Star Wars saga concluded (we all thought) with Return of the Jedi.

Local Hero is not a blockbuster: it’s a “sleeper” film that has acquired a growing following over time. With a tight script and direction by Forsyth, gorgeous cinematography, solid lead performances by Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster, a soundtrack by Mark Knopfler, and the first film role for Peter Capaldi (currently starring in Doctor Who), Local Hero offers loads of immediate satisfaction. It also, however, quietly and humorously dismantles every precious sentiment we thought we held. They all go. National and political identity, language, gender, culture, even species divisions and the distinction between the natural and the built world — they all slowly, beguilingly fall apart.

To be replaced with—what? That’s up to you, up to us. Come for the movie satisfaction. Stay for the transformation. —Dr. Kellogg

Jessica Lee Richardson to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Feb 10

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a fiction reading byJessica Lee Richardson on Wednesday, February 10, at 6pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.Jessica Lee Richardson is Visiting Assistant Professor of creative writing at Coastal Carolina University. Her first book of stories, It Had Been Planned and There Were Guides won the Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize and is on the longlist for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Award. Her short stories and poems have won awards from the National Society of Arts and Letters and the F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald museum and have been featured online at The Short FormPloughshares, and the Authonomy Sunday Shorts Series by Harper Collins. Her fictions have appeared in the Atlas Review, the Collagist, Hobart, the Indiana ReviewJoyland, the Masters Review, and Western Humanities Review among other places.

January 2016

January Scholars' Symposium, Jan 28

Join us Thursday, January 28th in Edwards 164 from 2p-4p for our first Scholars' Symposium of the semester. We will have a presentation by Dr. Becky Childs and a co-presentation by English major Ashley Canter and Dr. Denise Paster.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors, graduate students, or undergraduate students. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

ENGL Dept Film Series Fellini's Satyricon, Jan 21

The 1960s peaked as they ended, which is when the film that best embodies the staggering artistic wealth of that decade, Fellini Satyricon (1969), was released. In the hands of the supreme Italian auteur Federico Fellini, this picaresque (not picturesque) fever dream of vignettes set during the reign of the mad Roman emperor Nero immerses the viewer in a narrative at once unholy and resplendent, indecent and sublime. Fellini offers no saving graces, homilies, or bromides in this panorama of lechery and deviance, where even celluloid color bursts the bounds of propriety. Enter the labyrinth of repressed desire, in which, gripped by fear, all human beings stumble blindly, and emerge with Fellini into a landscape where cruelty, lust, gluttony, and godless humor run free in a delirium of visual poetry. Return to 1969, return to ancient Rome, return to the root of your secret wishes: seeFellini Satyricon! —Dr. Hamelman

AHGEP Fulbright Lectures by Dr. Anna Sanina, Jan 19

As part of CCU's Arts and Humanities Global Experience Program (AHGEP), we announce the first of four Fulbright scholars visiting CCU this semester with a visit by Dr. Anna Sanina on Tuesday, January 19, 2016. Dr. Sanina (Ph. D. Sociology) is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Administration at St. Petersburg and is on Fulbright residency at Indiana University, Bloomington. An expert in political sociology, Dr. Sanina's current work focuses on digital cultures of activism among the youth of Russia. Her recent publications include articles and book chapters on digital culture and political and cultural identity in Russia, youth culture and visible and invisible forms of resistance, cultures of loyalty and patriotism in contemporary Russia, and economic crises and formation of state identity.

Dr. Sanina's first talk, titled "Visual Irony in Digital Culture: Field Study of Social Media in the Age of Globalization," will take place from 10:30a-11:30a on Tuesday, January 19 in the James J. Johnson Auditorium and is open to all CCU and HGTC students, faculty and staff.

Dr. Sanina's second talk, titled "Patriotism and Patriotic Education in Contemporary Russia" will take place from 5:00p-6:00p on Tuesday, January 19 in Wall 309. A brief reception will follow the evening lecture, when light refreshments will be served. The lectures are free and open to the public.

If you have any questions about Dr. Sanina's visit or future AHGEP Fulbright Lectures, please contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

December 2015

Ice Cream and a Movie with the English Department, December 1

The English Department invites all English majors and minors, as well as students interested in becoming a major or minor, to hang out with the English Professors and fellow English majors for Ice Cream and a Movie. The ice cream will be served in the Lib Jackson Student Union Rotunda starting at 4pm, and a showing of The Seventh Seal by Ingmar Bergman will follow at 6pm in the new Student Union Theatre. This event is free and open to all interested in English Studies at Coastal Carolina University.

November 2015

Reading by author Ron Rash, Nov 18

The English Department in conjunction with the Burroughs Fund for Southern Studies, the Waccamaw Center, the Master of Arts in Writing program, and the Words to Say It series announces the upcoming reading by award winning and New York Times best selling novelist, poet, and short story writer Ron Rash on Wednesday, November 18 in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116) at 5:00pm. The reading is free and open to the public. For more information contact Dr. Daniel Cross Turner (843) 349-2432.

Ron Rash is one of the preeminent writers of the contemporary American South. Born in the South Carolina upcountry, Rash grew up in the western North Carolina mountains, and his writing centers around both historical and contemporary stories of the southern Appalachians.

Rash is the author of The New York Times bestselling novel The Cove (2012) in addition to five other highly acclaimed novels, Serena (2009 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist), One Foot in EdenSaints at the RiverThe World Made Straight, and the newly released Above the Waterfall (2015). He has also published four collections of poetry and five collections of short stories, among them Nothing Gold Can StayChemistry (2008 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist), and Burning Bright (2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award winner). Rash has twice won the prestigious O. Henry Prize, has received the James Still Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and was inducted into the South Carolina Academy of Authors in 2010. He is Parris Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina University.

November Scholars' Symposium, Nov 10

Join us Tuesday, November 10th in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:30p for our third Scholars' Symposium of the semester. We will have a presentation by Dr. Jen Boyle and a co-presentation by Dr. Ray Moye and Dr. Anna Oldfield.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, see the Scholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Mickayla Smith wins 19th Paul Rice Broadside Series Contest, Nov 9

The Coastal Carolina English Department is pleased to announce "the Truth in war" by Mickayla Smith as the winner of the 19th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest. This poem was selected by the final judge poet Jonathan Fink. Mickayla will receive a $100.00 prize and 25 copies of the broadside, which will be produced by the end of the semester in an edition of 100 numbered copies.

Commenting on his selection of "the Truth in war," Fink writes, "'the Truth in war' navigates well the many challenges of the sestina form. The poet chooses strong and specific repeating words for structural integrity in the poem and also demonstrates a creative and flexible mind by utilizing slight variations in the repeating words depending on the context of each stanza. (Perhaps my favorite moment in the poem is the choice of 'tear our' as the repetition of 'terror.') Most of all, I appreciate the ways in which the poem approaches the subject of war from the persona’s subjective experience. 'Soldiers are dreamers,' the poet Siegfried Sassoon wrote, and, in 'the Truth in war,' war returns as both dream and terror."

Fink also awarded honorable mention to Veronica Good’s "Let’s Not Talk About the Girl," and Lindsey Hilburn’s "Snowcone Ceiling Tiles."

The broadside of "the Truth in war" will be available in the next few weeks. Those wishing to acquire a copy of the broadside (or previous Paul Rice contest winners) should contact Jason Ockert in the Department of English. The deadline for the 20th contest in the Paul Rice series will be announced early in the spring semester 2016.

October 2015

Sigma Tau Delta Creative Writing Mixer, Oct 22

Sigma Tau Delta (the English Honors Society at CCU) presents the Creative Writing Mixer, a creative writing reading and contest taking place October 22 at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116).  Undergraduate students wishing to read their creative work and participate in the contest should sign up with Sigma Tau Delta advisors Dr. Anna Oldfield (Edwards 204) or Dr. Cynthia Port (Edwards 290) or in the English Department Office(Edwards 224) by October 16.  There will also be five late entries allowed at the night of the event.  A panel of judges will evaluate the creative works, and prizes will be awarded.  Students may perform any creative piece but are asked to keep pieces to a 3 page maximum for time constraints.  Students reading a piece should arrive at 5:00pm to get organized before the event.  All are welcome to attend.  For more information email Sigma Tau Delta.

Roundtable Discussion on the Writing of Ron Rash, Oct 15

In anticipation of the upcoming readings by preeminent contemporary Southern writer Ron Rash, members of theEdwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts at Coastal Carolina University will hold a roundtable discussion and audience question and answer session entitled “Tales of the Ragged Mountains: A Celebration of the Writing of Ron Rash.”  The roundtable, moderated by Dr. Daniel Cross Turner, will take place Thursday, October 15 from 6p-7:30p at the Carolina Forest Public Library.  This roundtable is free and open to the public. 

Roundtable discussion to include the following:

  • Dr. Amanda M. Brian, Associate Professor (European History), “World War I at Home: The Great War and Southern History in Ron Rash’s The Cove
  • Dr. J. Daniel Hasty, Assistant Professor (Linguistics), “But You Can’t Take the Mountains Out of the Boy: Appalachian Identity and the New South”
  • Mr. Hastings Hensel, Lecturer (Creative Writing), “A ‘Song More Sustained’: Ron Rash’s Poetry, and the Poetry of His Fiction”
  • Dr. Emma Howes, Assistant Professor (Appalachian Studies), “The Hill of the Mill: Southern Appalachian Representations in Eureka Mill
  • Dr. Tripthi Pillai, Assistant Professor (Renaissance Literature), “Doom and Gloom in Ron Rash: Something Rich and Strange About Unlocked Spaces and Times”
  • Dr. Daniel Cross Turner, Associate Professor (Southern Literature), “The Appalachian Book of the Dead: Ron Rash’s Tales of the Mountain South”

In conjunction with the Burroughs Fund for Southern Studies, the Waccamaw Center, the Master of Arts in Writing program at CCU, and the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Ron Rash will be reading at Coastal Carolina University on Wednesday, November 18 in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116) at 5:00pm. For more information contact Dr. Daniel Cross Turner

October Scholars' Symposium, Oct 13

Join us Tuesday, October 13th in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:30p for our second Scholars' Symposium of the semester. We will have two presentations. Hastings Hensel will be reading from his current poetry collection. Next, Dr. Alan Reid will be sharing work from his most recent scholarly project.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, see theScholars' Symposium website or contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Joe Oestreich and Scott Pleasant to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Oct 8

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a creative non-fiction reading by Joe Oestreich and Scott Pleasant on Thursday, October 8, at 6pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Joe Oestreich is an Associate Professor of Creative Nonfiction in the English Department at Coastal Carolina University and Scott Pleasant is the Director of the Writing Center at Coastal Carolina University. Oestreich and Pleasant will read excerpts from their new book Lines of Scrimmage: A Story of Football, Race, and Redemption. The book chronicles the 1989 Conway High School football boycott, in which 31 of the team's 37 black players walked away in protest, sparking a larger movement in Horry County's African American community. After the reading, Nelljean Rice (Dean of University College at CCU) will moderate a discussion.

Call for submission to the 19th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest, Oct 1

The English Department is pleased to announce the 19th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series contest.  The Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series (named in honor and memory of Paul Rice, professor of English at CCU 1987-2004) is a poetry competition open to current Coastal Carolina undergraduate students.  Poems must be submitted through email to Professor Jason Ockert, Coordinator of Creative Writing, by Friday, October 16.  Poems can be no more than 40 lines long.  There is no restriction regarding subject, style, or form.  The winning poem will be selected by an outside judge to be named at a later time.  The winning poet (to be announced Monday, April 6) will receive $100, and the poem will be published as a broadside in an edition of 100 copies and will be considered for publication in Archarios.  For a complete list of rules and example poems from past winners, see the Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series website. Contact Jason Ockert with any further questions.

September 2015

Author Erica Dawson to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Sept 16

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a poetry reading by Erica Dawson on Wednesday, September 16, at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Erica Dawson is the author of of two collections of poetry: The Small Blades Hurt and Big-Eyed Afraid. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, Birmingham Poetry Review, Crab Orchard Review, Harvard Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and other journals and anthologies. Erica is an assistant professor of English and Writing at the University of Tampa, and she serves as Director of UT's low-residency MFA in Creative Writing.

English Department Scholars' Symposium, Sept 15

Join us Tuesday, September 15th in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:30p for our initial Scholars' Symposium of the semester. We will have two presentations. Dr. Tripthi Pillai and Dr. Dan Turner will share work from their book chapter on Ron Rash and William Shakespeare. Next, Assamzhan Zhaparova, a visiting scholar from Kazakhstan who is completing her Ph.D. under Dr. Anna Oldfield’s supervision, will present work on metaphor and translation focusing on the works of 19th century Kazakhstani poet Abay Kunanbay.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of faculty and students of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, contactDr. Tripthi Pillai.

Dr. Dan Turner publishes new scholarly work, Sept 9

Associate Professor Dan Turner has published a new scholarly work entitledUndead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture, (Louisiana State University Press). Turner coedited the essay collection with professors Eric Gary Anderson (George Mason University) and Taylor Hagood (Florida Atlantic University).

Undead Souths is a field-defining work that explores diverse forms of haunting and horror associated with the American South. Depictions of the undead in the South comprise a wide variety of media and historical periods, from current depictions of vampires in True Blood and zombies in The Walking Dead; to well-known authors like Edgar Allan Poe, Faulkner, and Flannery O'Connor; to Civil War battlefield daguerreotypes and Confederate ghosts; to the haunted architectures of old New Orleans; and to vintage horror films like White Zombie. Along with these physical manifestations, southern undeadness also appears in symbolic, psychological, and cultural forms, including the social death endured by enslaved people, the Cult of the Lost Cause that resurrected the fallen heroes of the Confederacy as secular saints, and mourning rites revived by Native Americans forcibly removed from the American Southeast. The result is an engaging, inclusive collection that establishes cultural crossings between the South and other regions within and outside the U.S.

Announcing upcoming reading by author Ron Rash, Nov 18

The English Department in conjunction with the Burroughs Fund for Southern Studies, the Waccamaw Center, the Master of Arts in Writing program, and the Words to Say It series is pleased to announce the upcoming reading by Ron Rash on Wednesday, November 18 in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116) at 5:00pm. The reading is free and open to the public. For more information contact Dr. Daniel Cross Turner (843) 349-2432.

Ron Rash is one of the preeminent writers of the contemporary American South. Born in the South Carolina upcountry, Rash grew up in the western North Carolina mountains, and his writing centers around both historical and contemporary stories of the southern Appalachians.

Rash is the author of The New York Times bestselling novel The Cove (2012) in addition to five other highly acclaimed novels, Serena (2009 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist), One Foot in EdenSaints at the RiverThe World Made Straight, and the newly released Above the Waterfall (2015). He has also published four collections of poetry and five collections of short stories, among them Nothing Gold Can StayChemistry (2008 PEN/Faulkner Award finalist), and Burning Bright (2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award winner). Rash has twice won the prestigious O. Henry Prize, has received the James Still Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and was inducted into the South Carolina Academy of Authors in 2010. He is Parris Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina University.

August 2015

The English Department welcomes Jessica Richardson as Visiting Assistant Professor, Aug 17

The English Department is excited to welcome Jessica Lee Richardson as Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Writing specializing in fiction. Jessica earned her MFA in fiction from the University of Alabama in 2013 and taught at Rutgers University before coming to CCU. Her short story collection, It Had Been Planned and There Were Guides, won the 2014 Ronald Sukenick Innovative Fiction Prize and will appear in Fiction Collective Two this fall. Jessica's work has won awards from the National Society of Arts and Letters and the F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum.  Jessica's fiction and poetry have appeared or are forthcoming from The Short Form, Ploughshares, and the Authonomy Sunday Shorts Series by Harper Collins, the Atlas Review, BOMB Magazine, Big Lucks, the Collagist, Hobart, Indiana Review, the Masters Review, Joyland, and Western Humanities Review among other places. She is currently working on two new collections and two new novels. You can read some of her stories at her website.

April 2015

Author Jason Ockert to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, April 23

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a faculty showcase fiction reading by Jason Ockert on Thursday, April 23, at 4:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Jason Ockert is the author of Wasp Box, his debut novel, and two collections of short stories: Neighbors of Nothing and Rabbit Punches. Winner of the Dzanc Short Story Collection Contest, Jason has also been honored by the Atlantic Monthly, the Mary Roberts Rinehart Award, and the Shirley Jackson Award. His work has appeared in several journals and anthologies, including New Stories from the SouthBest American Mystery StoriesOxford AmericanThe Iowa ReviewOne Story, and McSweeney’s. Jason is an Associate Professor of Creative Writing at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina.

Scholar's Symposium, April 16

Join us Thursday (April 16) in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:30p for our final Scholars' Symposium of the semester.  Dr. Dan Albergotti and Dr. Keaghan Turner will each be sharing their recent work with us. Coffee, tea, and cookies will be provided.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of members of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Author Tim Mayers to speak for the MA in Writing Program, April 13

The Coastal Carolina University MA in Writing program presents a talk entitled “(Re)Writing Craft: Ten Years later” by Dr. Tim Mayers on Monday, April 13, at 6pm in Edwards 256.  This talk is free and open to the public. 

Tim Mayers’s work focuses on the past, present, and possible future states of English studies; more specifically, he explores points of overlap and contention between composition studies, creative writing, and literary criticism.  Mayers’s 2005 book (Re)Writing Craft: Composition Creative Writing and The Future of English dealt with the gap that exists in many English departments between creative writers, compositionists, and literary scholars.  Mayers, himself a compositionist and creative writer, explores the connections between creative writing and composition studies programs, which currently exist as separate fields within the larger and more amorphous field of English studies. If creative writing and composition studies are brought together in productive dialogue, they can, in his view, succeed in inverting the common hierarchy in English departments that privileges interpretation of literature over the teaching of writing. 

Dr. Mayers is an Associate Professor of English at Millersville University in Pennsylvania where he teaches composition, creative writing, and literary criticism.

March 2015

Nick Powell wins 18th Paul Rice Broadside Series Contest, March 31

The Coastal Carolina English Department is pleased to announce “Ars Poetica” by Nick Powell as the winner of the 18th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest. This poem was selected by the final judge, poet Tarfia Faizullah of Detroit, Michigan. Nick will receive a $100.00 prize and 25 copies of the broadside, which will be produced by the end of the semester in an edition of 100 numbered copies.

Commenting on her selection of “Ars Poetica,” Faizullah said, “It is a challenge to write an ars poetica that does the dual work of describing the act of creation while being an act of creation itself. The images and music in this poem tumble into each other into until the final and gorgeous revelation.

Faizullah also awarded honorable mention to Victoria Green’s “May 6, 2007” and Maggie Nichols’s “Délabré.”

The broadside of “Ars Poetica” will be available in the next few weeks. Those wishing to acquire a copy of the broadside should contact Cara Blue Adams. The deadline for the 19th contest in the Paul Rice series will be announced early in the fall semester 2015.

Scholars' Symposium, March 26

Join us Thursday (March 26) in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:00p for our second Scholars' Symposium of the semester.  Associate Professor Joe Oestreich will be sharing a portion of one of his recent creative projects with us. Coffee and cookies will be provided.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of members of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

English Department Faculty honored for book publication, March 5

Three members of the English Department to be recognized at the Edwards College of Humanities and Fine Arts Spring 2015 Authors' Reception.

Poets Chad Davidson and Gregory Fraser to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, March 5

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a unique double poetry reading featuring Chad Davidson and Gregory Fraser on Thursday, March 5, at 5:30pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Chad Davidson is the author of From the Fire Hills (2014), The Last Predicta (2008), and Consolation Miracle (2003), all from Southern Illinois UP.  Davidson is also co-author with Gregory Fraser of Analyze Anything: A Guide to Critical Reading and Writing (Bloomsbury, 2012) and Writing Poetry: Creative and Critical Approaches (Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009). He is currently a Professor of literature and creative writing and director of the School of the Arts at the University of West Georgia near Atlanta.

Gregory Fraser is the author of three poetry collections: Strange Pietà(Texas Tech University Press), Answering the Ruins, and Designed for Flight (both from Northwestern University Press). As stated above, he is co-author with Chad Davidson of the textbooks Writing Poetry andAnalyze Anything. His poems have appeared in The Paris ReviewThe Southern Review, and The Gettysburg Review, among others. Fraser is the recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and serves as a Professor of English and creative writing at the University of West Georgia.

February 2015

English Week, Feb 23-27

Come learn what CCU's English Department has to offer as we kick off English Week‌. During the day, visit our table in the Edwards lobby to learn more about the English Major, our various Minors, our upcoming course offereings, and special programs. Then, on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday afternoon starting at 4:30pm join us for a special event.

Tuesday: Faculty Q&A. Learn more about English Studies and careers for English Majors, as well as little-known facts about English faculty in an open forum Q&A. Beginning at 4:30pm in Edwards 256. Refreshments will be served.

Wednesday: Team Trivia. Team up with your friends and favorite English Faculty in a fun-filled English trivia competition. Beginning at 4:30pm in The Black Box Theatre (Edwards 117). Refreshments will be served.

Thursday: Readings and Reception. Come listen to readings from the creative works of English Faculty and English Students, followed by a meet and greet with English Department Faculty. Pizza will be served. Beginning at 4:30pm in The Black Box Theatre (Edwards 117).

Scholars' Symposium, Feb 19

Join us Thursday (Oct 19) in Edwards 164 from 1:30p-3:30p for this semester's first Scholars' Symposium. Dr. Becky ChildsDr. J. Daniel Hasty, and Graduate Student Brooke Parker will present their collaborative work on language variation and change in modern Appalachia. Coffee and cookies will be provided.

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of members of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Call for submission to the 18th Contest in the Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series, Feb 10

The English Department is pleased to announce the 18th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series contest.  The Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series (named in honor and memory of Paul Rice, professor of English at CCU 1987-2004) is a poetry competition open to current Coastal Carolina undergraduate students.  Poems must be submitted through email to Professor Cara Blue Adams, Coordinator of Creative Writing, by Monday, March 2.  Poems can be no more than 40 lines long.  There is no restriction regarding subject, style, or form.  The winning poem will be selected by an outside judge to be named at a later time.  The winning poet (to be announced Monday, April 6) will receive $100, and the poem will be published as a broadside in an edition of 100 copies and will be considered for publication in Archarios.  Please contact Cara Blue Adams with any questions.

November 2014

Author Dan Albergotti to speak for the Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Nov 13

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a poetry reading by our very own Dr. Dan Albergotti on Thursday, Nov 13, at 7pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Dan Albergotti is the author of Millennial Teeth (Southern Illinois University Press, 2014) and The Boatloads (BOA Editions, 2008), as well as a limited-edition chapbook, The Use of the World (Unicorn Press, 2013). His poems have appeared in The Cincinnati ReviewFive PointsThe Southern ReviewThe Virginia Quarterly Review, and Pushcart Prize XXXIII, as well as other journals and anthologies. A graduate of the MFA program at UNC Greensboro and former poetry editor of The Greensboro Review, Albergotti is a Professor of English and Chair of the English Department at Coastal Carolina University in Conway, South Carolina.

Mikaella Victoria Antonio wins 17th Paul Rice Broadside Series Contest, November 3

The Coastal Carolina English Department is pleased to announce “We Are Ugly” by Mikaella VictoriaAntonio as the winner of the 17th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series Contest. This poem was selected by the final judge, poet Matthew Olzmann of Asheville, North Carolina. Mikaella will receive a $100.00 prize and 25 copies of the broadside, which will be produced by the end of the semester in an edition of 100 numbered copies.

Olzmann also awarded honorable mention to Nicholas Powell's "A Good Memory with You” and Gabriel Miller's “Communion.”

The broadside of “We Are Ugly” will be available in the next few weeks. Those wishing to acquire a copy of the broadside should contact Cara Blue Adams. The deadline for the 18th contest in the Paul Rice series will be announced early in the spring semester 2015.

October 2014

Scholars' Symposium, Oct 23

Join us Thursday (Oct 23) in Edwards 164 from 1:00p-3:00p for this semester's first Scholars' Symposium. Dr. Kate Faber Oestreich and Dr. Alan Reid will present their work to us. Dr. Oestreich is a literature professor specializing in British Literature of the long 19th century, and Dr. Reid is a composition and rhetoric professor specializing in metacognition and self-regulation in new media. Coffee and cookies will be provided

The English Department Scholars' Symposium highlights the expertise and ongoing research of members of the English Department. Scholars' Symposia are held several times a semester, and usually include presentations by two English professors. For more information on past, current, and upcoming Symposia, contact Dr. Tripthi Pillai.

Author David James Poissant to speak for The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Oct 23

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a creative non-fiction reading by David James Poissant on Thursday, Oct 23, at 7pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

David James Poissant's short story collection The Heaven of Animals was published by Simon & Schuster on March 11, 2014, and he is currently working on a novel Class, Order, Family to be published by Simon & Schuster. His writing has been awarded the Matt Clark Prize, the George Garrett Fiction Award, the RopeWalk Fiction Chapbook Prize, and the Alice White Reeves Memorial Award from the National Society of Arts & Letters, as well as awards from The Chicago Tribune and The Atlantic and Playboy. Poissant's stories and essays have appeared in The AtlanticThe Chicago TribuneGlimmer TrainThe New York TimesOne StoryPlayboyPloughsharesThe Southern Review, and in the New Stories from the South and Best New American Voices anthologies. Poissant teaches in the MFA program at the University of Central Florida and lives in Orlando with his wife and daughters.

September 2014

Call for submission to the 17th Contest in the Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series, Sept 19

The English Department is pleased to announce the 17th Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series contest.  The Paul Rice Poetry Broadside Series (named in honor and memory of Paul Rice, professor of English at CCU 1987-2004) is a poetry competition open to current Coastal Carolina undergraduate students.  Poems must be submitted through email to Cara Blue Adams, Coordinator of Creative Writing, by Wednesday, October 15.  Poems can be no more than 40 lines long.  There is no restriction regarding subject, style, or form.  The winning poem will be selected by an outside judge to be named at a later time.  The winning poet (to be announced Monday, November 3) will receive $100, and the poem will be published as a broadside in an edition of 100 copies.  Please contact Cara Blue Adams with any questions.

Author Aisha Sabatini Sloan to speak for The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series, Sept 11

The Words to Say It Visiting Writers Series presents a creative non-fiction reading by Aisha Sabatini Sloan on Thursday, Sept 11, at 7pm in Johnson Auditorium (Wall 116). This reading is free and open to the public, and a small reception and book signing will follow.

Aisha Sabatini Sloan's essay collection, The Fluency of Light: Coming of Age in a Theater of Black and White was chosen as a finalist for the 1913 First Book Contest in 2011, and published by the University of Iowa Press in 2013. Her essays have been named notable for the Best American Non-Required Reading and Best American Essays anthologies of 2011, nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and published in Ninth Letter,Identity TheoryMichigan Quarterly ReviewTerrain.orgCallalooThe Southern Review, and Guernica. Aisha earned an MA in Cultural Studies and Studio Art from the Gallatin School of Individualized Study at NYU, and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from the University of Arizona. Aisha is currently teaching courses in literature and creative writing at Carleton College and is a contributing editor for Guernica: A Magazine of Art & Politics.

August 2014

English Department Welcomes New Faculty, August 18

Emma Howes joins the Department of English as an assistant professor. She recently completed her Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Massachusetts. Her dissertation examines literacy campaigns as they were incorporated into industrial welfare work in Carolina cotton mill villages around the turn of the 20thcentury. She has received fellowships and grants from the American Association of University Women, Duke University, and the University of Massachusetts, and she has presented her research at the Conference on College Composition and Communication.

Alan Reid joins the Department of English as an assistant professor. He completed his Ph.D. in Instructional Design & Technology at Old Dominion University in 2013. His work has appeared in Immersive Environments, Augmented Realities and Virtual Worlds: Assessing Future Trends in Education, and he has already been instrumental in designing the new digital badge initiative associated with the redesign of the first-year writing program at CCU.

Christian Smith joins the Department of English as an assistant professor. He completed his Ph.D. in Composition and Rhetoric at the University of South Carolina in May 2014 with a dissertation titled “From Capture to Care: Attention, Digital Media, and the Future of Composition.” He has presented his research regularly over the past few years at the Conference on College Composition and Communication and the Rhetoric Society of America Conference.

Keaghan Turner joins the Department of English as an assistant professor. She completed her Ph.D. in English literature at the University of South Carolina in 2006 with a dissertation on representations of nursing in four British women’s novels from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century. She has recently presented her scholarship at the Victorians Institute and the Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference, and her work has appeared in South Writ Large: Stories, Arts, and Ideas from the Global South.